PayPal: We won’t block Safari users

“PayPal, the online payment system owned by eBay, will prevent people who use older Web browsers that don’t have built in phishing detectors from accessing its site, InfoWorld reports. While the move won’t stop people with old browsers from visiting fake PayPal sites, the company hopes that the move will force people who frequent the real PayPal to upgrade,” Ben Worthen blogs for The Wall Street Journal.

“We just spoke to PayPal. It seems we in the media are reading too much into this. It will block people using old browsers and old operating systems, but contrary to many reports it will not block Apple’s Safari browser,” Worthen reports.

Full article here.

38 Comments

  1. The funny thing is that the blocked browsers will work only on phishing sites if the real Pay Pal site actually blocks them.

    How far does that actually improve security? ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />

  2. Well looks like all that alarmist PayPal trash talking that went on yesterday was a waste of everyone’s time.

    None the less….I still have to use more than one browser b/c Apple refuses to make Safari 100% internet compatible.

    Just my $0.02

  3. Making blocked browsers work only on phishing sites and not the real Pay Pal site improves security by letting the phishers empty the phishee’s bank accounts, therefore having nothing left to steal.

  4. pong: Making blocked browsers work only on phishing sites and not the real Pay Pal site improves security by letting the phishers empty the phishee’s bank accounts, therefore having nothing left to steal.

    That makes sense, of course! ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

  5. Apple refuses to make Safari 100% internet compatible.

    No, Apple refuses to make Safari 100% Microsoft compatible. Many websites code for Internet Exploder, complete with Microsoft’s non-compliant extensions that only work with Exploder.

  6. Ray,

    You are displaying your ignorance. Please stop. It’s hurting you.
    “Internet compatible” is a meaningless term you made up. So what percentage is Safari? 60%? 80%? You don’t know because you made it up.

    My guess is that you have one or two sites that you visit that don’t support Safari. That is not Safari’s fault, it’s the fault of the developers who use proprietary, non-platform agnostic technology.

    I am a web developer. If anything, Safari is more “internet compatible” (again, completely arbitrary phrase).

    As qka said, it’s MSIE that is the problem. They created their own proprietary “standards” and now every web developer has to cater to their “standards.” Meanwhile, every other browser in the world follows a list of accepted, clearly defined rules for rendering web pages. Safari adheres to this list quite thoroughly. Even better than Firefox.

  7. @Ray

    “None the less….I still have to use more than one browser b/c Apple refuses to make Safari 100% internet compatible.”

    Ahahaha..hahaha.hahaha… OMG.. Ray did you just crawl out from under a rock? LOL

  8. It seems to me everyone’s missing the REAL surprise in the article —

    “It seems we in the media are reading too much into this.”

    Is anyone else here surprised at some actual HONESTY and INTEGRITY in the tech journalism field? (From someone besides Daniel Eran, that is.)

    I applaud you, Mr. Worthen.

  9. I still can not get flash video working correctly on all of the sites I navigate. On some it works, on some it works on certain pages but not others. I’ve worked on this problem for hours to no avail… all I can figure is there’s some legacy hiccup in my machine I can’t reinstall over… it makes me sad – because it all works as advertised in Firefox. I can’t explain it.

  10. Being a Mac fan here, I think we should fend for ourselves here and protect ourselves as consumers. Just because someone can’t access some web page because Apple won’t accept adding extra code for getting MS code to work doesn’t mean we should attack someone for getting terminology wrong. Very ignorant fan boy-esque of you all to play on that part while brushing incompatibility under the carpet.

    Microsoft flung it’s code on the net and there is no reversing that fact. These websites using such code will be around for a long time and as such Apple should make Safari compatible to allow us customers less hassle. Unless Microsoft is stopping Apple from doing so I don’t see why they wouldn’t. What helps Apple’s customer base is satisfaction and it’s obvious some people happen to feel the same as Ray.

    I myself have not found much incompatibility on websites I’ve been encountering lately. I just bought a shiny new iMac 2 weeks ago and yet to find problems net-wise. It is such a good time now to buy a Mac I can say with joy! I wish we could compare brain activity of someone on a Mac and someone on a PC and see how stress levels compare in an average day. Do scientists have a machine that can measure happy?

  11. Oh that you guys’ were web developers. When a websiteb is created, a web designer basically has to design it twice: once according to W3 standards, and then again to make it work with IE. This is a source of perpetual frustration for almost every web designer I know. It’s not like IE can do everything a modern browser like Safari can do, it’s just different code. It’s like IE just doesn’t do anything you’d expect it to, so you have to fix all the IE bugs in your site using messy IE hacks or “conditional comments.”

    The corporate world had become entrenched in MS, which means all their cool-aid drinking MS designers/developers made things using MS-proprietary technology (which MS developed as a means of lock-in). But in the last 6 years the browser market has changed drastically. Now it’s just taking a while for all the websites to catch up with web standards.

    People should be writing the companies who’s websites are bit Safari compatible and asking them for Safari compatibility. That’s the problem that needs to be addressed.

    If Safari were to add compatibility for MS’ buggy and messy behavior, it would completely defeat the purpose of even developing a modern browser. And it would only perpetuate the problem. MSIE is the definition of archaic buggy browsers.

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