NBC wants back into Apple’s iTunes Store

“NBC Universal would like to have its TV shows distributed once again through Apple’s iTunes service, a top executive said Wednesday, but he called for antipiracy measures to help protect his business’ revenue,” Stephen Shankland reports for CNET.

MacDailyNews Take: When will these people learn? DRM doesn’t work. Pirates will always pirate, regardless of whatever antipiracy measures are used. Just get the content available in a timely fashion, in good quality for a reasonable price and you’ll make money.

Shankland continues, “George Kliavkoff, chief digital officer at NBC Universal, didn’t specifically mention Apple by name in his request, but it was clear he had the iPod maker in mind when it came to combating people’s consumption of pirated content.”

Shankland reports, “‘If you look at studies about MP3 players, especially leading MP3 players and what portion of that content is pirated, and think about how that content gets onto that device, it has to go through a gatekeeping piece of software, which would be a convenient place to put some antipiracy measures,’ Kliavkoff said in an onstage interview at the Ad:Tech conference here. One of the big issues for NBC is piracy. We are financially harmed every day by piracy. It results in us not being able to invest as much money in the next generation of film and TV products.'”

MacDailyNews Take: Dummy doesn’t get it.

Shankland continues, “In 2007, NBC Universal pulled its TV content from iTunes when the two companies disagreed about pricing. Kliavkoff made it clear that he’d like the conduit back, though. ‘We’d love to be on iTunes. It has a great customer experience. We’d love to figure out a way to distribute our content on iTunes,’ he said, but wouldn’t comment on any negotiations. ‘We have film distribution with iTunes so yes, we do talk to Apple,’ he said.”

“Price appears still to be a sticking point,” Shankland reports.

MacDailyNews Take: So, now we finally get to the heart of the matter.

Shankland continues, “‘The music industry guys would have something to say about how the pricing has affected their product over the last few years,’ Kliavkoff said.

MacDailyNews Take: The music industry is not negatively affected by Apple’s pricing. They are negatively affected because consumers can now choose and are no longer forced to buy bundles (albums on CD) at exorbitant prices. Tough. Don’t blame Apple because technology allowed for consumer choice. Last we looked, Apple sells the music labels’ product and gives them the bulk of the money. Again: DRM doesn’t work. Pirates will always pirate, regardless of whatever antipiracy measures are used. Just get the content available in a timely fashion, in good quality for a reasonable price and you’ll make money.

Shankland continues, “The Apple-NBC Universal spat has been a game of brinksmanship over which company needs the other more. Analysts at Forrester Research think Apple needs the content more than NBC needs the distribution.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “NeverFade” for the heads up.]

The analysts at Forrester Research or anywhere else who think that Apple needs the content more than NBC needs the distribution are idiots. Here’s why.

Jobs will let NBC back when NBC does as they are told by those who built, own, and operate the market-dominating iTunes Store.

52 Comments

  1. For one thing, video is DRM’d in iTunes, and I think as effectively as it can. And DRM is much more appropriate for video than music as well, given the way its used. But I say, why doesn’t apple just portal things like aTV and iPhone/Touch to the network streaming websites, where they can continue to use ad-based revenue? And come to think of it, why don’t network websites just adopt the Quicktime format so I can use my iphone to go to NBC.com, and watch their episodes and their ads on their terms? I’d prefer that over everything. aTV should allow the same BTW. It should allow you to surf ABC, NBC, VONGO, JOOST, and all those just like it does You Tube. That would keep the markets seperate (Hardware vs Content) and alleviate all these concerns

  2. screw nbc.

    I like some of their shows, but if they want to be jerks, I can keep getting their shows from other sources.

    I don’t mind paying a little. That is all it is worth to me. Stupid tv shows rot the mind anyway.

    Keep acting tough with apple, hello torrents.

  3. I don’t understand what’s going on with the price? Aren’t Apple letting NBC sell their content at the price they want?

    If that’s true, shouldn’t it be up to NBC to decide the price of the content that is sold, since it is owned by NBC?

  4. I know I will get flamed for saying some of this, but isn’t it all quite obvious?

    The TV industry already has a successful model that can work quite well AND prevent piracy problems.

    Ad-supported distribution. If you run the content the same way you do on TV (22 minutes of programming with 8 minutes of commercials) and then provide the content for download, piracy will vanish, as you can get it just as quickly from the source as you can a pirate.

    With this model, the distributor pays NOTHING for anti-piracy, makes money from advertisers, and the advertisers will know exactly how many times it was downloaded. Everybody wins.

  5. The other day I had the “pleasure” of experiencing one of NBC’s alternatives to the iTunes Store. I tried to watch an episode of Battlestar Gallatica on the Sci-Fi channel site. My watching was hampered by:

    1. A crapload of commercials
    2. I was limited to watching in a small window on my computer screen.
    3. I had no control over the streaming so after every 2 minutes, the video stopped for a minute so the streaming could catch up.

    Hey NBC, please take my two freakin’ dollars and let me watch your show commercial free and without streaming issues from the iTunes Store. Even though free is a really good price, quality is worth my $2.

  6. Actually the fact that NBC cracked first as to want back, is a sign that NBC needs apples distribution. They probably realized they are spending more money, and getting less watches than they had when they were on itunes to begin with.

    I know i don’t watch shows from them any more.

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