RUMOR: Intel’s ultra-mobile PC platform to power Apple’s next-gen iPhone, ‘Newton’

“Apple Inc. will form a closer bond with once-rival Intel Corp. early next year when it begins building a new breed of ultra-mobile processors from the chipmaker into a fresh generation of handheld devices,” Kasper Jade reports for AppleInsider.

“People familiar with the matter tell AppleInsider that Apple will soon emerge as one of the largest supporters of Intel’s “Menlow” Mobile Internet Device (MID) platform,” Jade reports.

“More specifically, those same people say, Apple has taken a liking to the upcoming 45-nanometer (nm) “Silverthorne” chip, agreeing to use it in not one but multiple products currently situated on its 2008 calendar year product roadmap,” Jade reports.

“Silverthorne is aimed specifically at cell phones, ultra-mobile PCs and other MIDs. The chip is expected to be as fast as the second-generation of Pentium M processors, but use only between half a watt and 2 watts of electrical power — about one tenth as much as a typical notebook chip,” Jade reports.

“Two seemingly apparent contenders appear to be the second-generation 3G iPhone and the much rumored Newton successor / ultra-portable slate computer,” Jade reports.

Much more in the full article here.

33 Comments

  1. Shesh, Apple might as well start selling Windows pre-installed too.

    How long will it be before Apple gets hit with a suit over the software/hardware lock-in?

    I can’t buy a non-glossy Mac OS X based mid-range computer and not allowed to transfer the OS to one that isn’t.

    WTF?

  2. “Ultra-mobile” stuff is slow, slow, slow.

    I’d rather have to haul around a little more weight than wait forever for things to load, render, refresh, and respond.

    Real tired of looking at that damn beach ball. This won’t help, I promise.

    And, I need my portables battery to last more than 15 minutes, don’t you?

    Stupid is as stupid does but Steve’s not stupid. He’s a genius and if he can hold up some paper thin laptop or someshuch, and declare it a life-changing breakthrough, they’ll fly off the shelves regardless of their uselessness.

  3. I just realized that my new eyeglasses are glossy. Does this mean I will be blind as a bat real soon? And what would happen if I used a glossy iMac wearing my glossy glasses? Would one negate the other and make it all good?

    Actually if the interior of the glasses are glossy it can cause reflections into the eye if light can get in from the sides. But this is minor because it’s only occurs briefly (because the head moves constantly, at least mine does.)

    Staring into a 24″ mirror wouldn’t be a problem, because it reflects all the light, giving the eyes one clear image.

    Staring into a 24″ glossy iMac (or any glossy screens, TV or monitor) causes eyestrain because there are two or more images, the screen image and the slightly out of focus reflections…your eyes constantly refocusing between them all.

    Now you know why it’s a major health concern.

    People claim to have to “see past the reflections” but ones eyes are on automatic regardless.

    With a portable device one can quickly change position to avoid reflections, like a glossy magazine. But stationary monitors are much more difficult to adopt to changing environmental conditions or places where one can’t eliminate the reflections.

    Then again people are ignorant of the health concerns of glossy screens until the problems with headaches, eyestrain and eventually corrective lenses are needed.

  4. It’s been driving me nuts since I started reading the “punny” comments… so I had to find out:

    “The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4- propionic acid receptor (also known as AMPA receptor, AMPAR, or quisqualate receptor) is a non-NMDA-type ionotropic transmembrane receptor for glutamate that mediates fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). Its name is derived from its ability to be activated by the artificial glutamate analog, AMPA. AMPARs are found in many parts of the brain and are the most commonly found receptor in the nervous system” —– Wikipedia

    Now I know why I laugh at the comments…

  5. @JoyLove

    I would have agree with your theory about glossy screens 100% before the introduction of the aluminium iMac, but sadly for those of us that were certain the glossy screens would cause problems, the facts of the matter contradict the theory so far.

    I have set five or six different people up with the new aluminium iMac in various offices with/without windows and in various light/shadow conditions, and basically no one has complained or even noticed the reflections on the screen. Even though most of these users are kinda high on the “inordinately picky” scale, no one has even whispered a complaint of any kind.

    I was shocked, as anything short of an Apple Cinema Display gives me a bit of a headache but the reality was that this was just not a problem for any users I have talked to.

  6. @Joy Love

    “Staring into a 24″ glossy iMac (or any glossy screens, TV or monitor) causes eyestrain because there are two or more images, the screen image and the slightly out of focus reflections…your eyes constantly refocusing between them all.”

    Isn’t that what our eyes do all day in the real world? Focus back and forth between things at different distances?

  7. Do we have to do this glossy screen thing every day? I think we know where we stand on this. But alas, Apple does not read MDN for product development ideas. If you don’t like glossy screens (and I certainly don’t) do as I have done, write to Apple. And when you’re in a retail store, make disparaging comments about them to customers within earshot of a Genius.

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