Apple releases how-to video explaining iPhone’s intelligent, predictive keyboard

Apple today released the latest in the company’s recent string of iPhone videos: “iPhone Keyboard.”

Apple advises:
• Start with just one index finger
• At first, be very deliberate with your finger taps
• Pay particular attention to the confirmation pop-ups and where your finger touches the screen

Apple has clearly spent a lot of time developing iPhone’s virtual keyboard. iPhone constantly checks what you’re typing against its built-in dictionary. When it finds a mistake, the iPhone makes a suggestion. To decline and keep the word as you typed it, just tap the suggested word. To accept iPhone’s suggestion, just tap the space bar. iPhone also uses its built-in dictionary along with complex mathematics to help correct mistake via pattern matching (for example, typing “ouzza” leads iPhone to offer “pizza” as a suggestion). iPhone also uses its built-in dictionary to predict the next letter you might tap and dynamically resizes the tap zones. It makes the next predicted keys larger and the others smaller as it zeros in on the particular word you’re typing.

iPhone changes its keyboard for different tasks, adapting its layout and keys for different apps.

The trick is to just type away and trust the intelligence of the iPhone keyboard. As you become more comfortable and more proficient, you can graduate to typing with two thumbs and, Apple says, “in less than a week you’ll likely discover yourself typing faster on iPhone than on any other small keyboard.”

The video (in your choice of sizes) is here: http://www.apple.com/iphone/usingiphone/keyboard.html

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Isabelle” for the heads up.]

52 Comments

  1. I think the iPhone is great, and I am looking forward to seeing it in Europe. I have used Macs since 1987, and barely know how to use a PC let alone set one up. Now, having established that I am not in any way a Mac hater, could someone please answer me a question. I only ask because I am curious.

    Does anyone on these message boards know anyone who has ever bought a mobile phone, let alone one costing $500.00?

    I have had a mobile phone since about 1990, and everyone I know either has their own given free by the network, or is supplied one by their company. Not one person I have ever known has actually bought one.

    I myself have just been upgraded to a Nokia 6300 by Orange. The phone I am sure is not a patch on the iPhone, but at a notional retail price of £175, it ain’t bad.

    Could someone explain to me who is going to jump from “free” to $500? I wish the iPhone well but, that’s a big jump.

  2. those ericssons are something like $900.

    You get what you pay for.

    Does your ‘free’ phone hold any water here? If so, why are you asking? This isn’t just a phone – it’s a gadget consolidator.

    No longer will I have to carry an iPod, phone, and powerbook around with me just to have the basic address/phone/browser/music/video/chat/etc.

    more than $500? I’d pay $1000, the $200 to Sprint/Nextel to drop ’em, the $60 for AppleCare, and smile the whole time.

    let’s get some real questions in here, please.

    MDN word: however – as in , if you don’t like it, however, you can KEEP your shitty free phone.

  3. those ericssons are something like $900.

    You get what you pay for.

    Does your ‘free’ phone hold any water here? If so, why are you asking? This isn’t just a phone – it’s a gadget consolidator.

    No longer will I have to carry an iPod, phone, and powerbook around with me just to have the basic address/phone/browser/music/video/chat/etc.

    more than $500? I’d pay $1000, the $200 to Sprint/Nextel to drop ’em, the $60 for AppleCare, and smile the whole time.

    let’s get some real questions in here, please.

    MDN word: however – as in , if you don’t like it, however, you can KEEP your shitty free phone.

  4. those ericssons are something like $900.

    You get what you pay for.

    Does your ‘free’ phone hold any water here? If so, why are you asking? This isn’t just a phone – it’s a gadget consolidator.

    No longer will I have to carry an iPod, phone, and powerbook around with me just to have the basic address/phone/browser/music/video/chat/etc.

    more than $500? I’d pay $1000, the $200 to Sprint/Nextel to drop ’em, the $60 for AppleCare, and smile the whole time.

    let’s get some real questions in here, please.

    MDN word: however – as in , if you don’t like it, however, you can KEEP your shitty free phone.

  5. those ericssons are something like $900.

    You get what you pay for.

    Does your ‘free’ phone hold any water here? If so, why are you asking? This isn’t just a phone – it’s a gadget consolidator.

    No longer will I have to carry an iPod, phone, and powerbook around with me just to have the basic address/phone/browser/music/video/chat/etc.

    more than $500? I’d pay $1000, the $200 to Sprint/Nextel to drop ’em, the $60 for AppleCare, and smile the whole time.

    let’s get some real questions in here, please.

    MDN word: however – as in , if you don’t like it, however, you can KEEP your shitty free phone.

  6. @M.A.D.:

    I thought the same at first, but hitting the space bar to select a suggestion IS intuitive, since that’s what you normally do after you’ve finished typing a word. It’s just in this case Apple has finished typing it for you. I think it shouldn’t be a problem to get used to this since we’re already conditioned to hit the space bar after a word.

  7. @M.A.D.
    Think of tapping on the word as pushing it away. It seems to me that the reason they use the spacebar to accept the word is that you’re going to tap the spacebar anyway before you type in the next word.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.