NPD: Apple Mac continues to take market share away from Windows PCs

“Apple’s share of desktop and notebook sales online and through brick-and-mortar stores in May rose to 13% from 11.6% in April [in the U.S.], according to The NPD Group,” Antone Gonsalves reports for InformationWeek.

“Apple notebooks and desktops in May continued to take market share away from Windows PCs in the consumer market,” Gonsalves reports.

“Apple’s share of desktop and notebook sales online and through brick-and-mortar stores rose to 13% from 11.6% in April, according to The NPD Group. Apple notebook sales rose to 14.3% of overall purchases from 12.5%, while desktop sales inched up to 10.4% from 10.2%,” Gonsalves reports.

“In May, the overall notebook market grew by 40% over the same month a year ago. Apple outpaced overall market growth with a year-to-year jump of 65%,” Gonsalves reports. “Windows-based notebooks saw a 37% increase in sales… Desktop sales in general were far less than notebooks, and neither Apple nor Windows PC vendors showed much progress.”

Full article here.

Gregg Keizer reports for Computerworld (Apple sells one of every seven notebooks), “Apple Inc. got help from the update to its MacBook laptops to push its share of the laptop market up nearly two points in May, to 14.3%, a research firm said today. ‘Whenever Apple gets a new product out, they get a nice bounce,’ said Stephen Baker, an analyst at NPD Group Inc. According to NPD’s data, the laptop ‘bounce’ was 14% month-over-month. ‘”Desktops sales are declining, but [Apple’s] are declining a little less than others.'”

“Baker also said he expects Apple will soon revamp its primary desktop line, the iMac, a move that Apple-centric bloggers predicted would happen at last week’s Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC), but are now forecasting for end of July or early August,” Keizer reports.

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Robert” for the heads up.]

40 Comments

  1. Mark,

    You don’t have to account for them. It’s a small, irrelevant number. The fact is they bought a Mac. You can be sure that Microsoft gets credit for a lot of PCs that are running Linux.

  2. “This is good but how do you account for the people who by the macs and then use them to run windows on them?”

    A sale is a sale dude. Apple isn’t sharing any money with MS for those people that use them for dual boot. Thing is, how do you account for it once they stop using their Windows security blanket and switch to OSX?

  3. Comment from: Mark
    “This is good but how do you account for the people who by the macs and then use them to run windows on them?”

    You don’t ‘account’ for them, you pray for them.

  4. <i>This is good but how do you account for the people who by the macs and then use them to run windows on them? —Mark

    If they bought a Mac, they’re curious about the Mac. To run Windows, all you need is any old crappy pc. Even to install Windows, they get their first look at the stunning OS X interface. Sooner or later, logging into Windows starts to look like the shabby mess it has always been.

  5. Comment from: Camel’s Milk Drinker
    “http://www.macnn.com/articles/07/06/22/ibm.on.iphone.security/
    Check this out! IBM’s take on thi iphone’s security.”

    Why? They didn’t say a thing other than a lot of people will try to hack the iPhone. How is that news worthy or interesting?

  6. @Mark

    This is good but how do you account for the people who by the macs and then use them to run windows on them

    you account them like me, I switched, cause I could, (and thought I needed) to run windows. 9 months later, I only use windows IE, to check my website when I make a change (that I made myself using iWeb, that more than paid more my Mac)

    Like Fred said
    Embrace first, then extinguish.

    It would be interesting to see, how many switched because they COULD run windows, and how many of them use windows now?

    http://www.stthomasexcursions.com/

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