InfoWorld: Apple’s Xserve Xeon ‘perfectly designed’

“A couple of weeks ago, Apple invited me to its campus to get a close-up look at Apple’s Xserve Xeon. It is a marvel of physical design, so much so that I find that it implausible that Xserve Xeon and Xserve G5 could have been designed by the same company. Xserve G5 was pretty tight, but Xserve Xeon makes its predecessor, not to mention ever PC 1U rack server I’ve seen, look slapped together,” Tom Yager writes for InfoWorld.

“I was struck by perfectly Xserve Xeon was designed, and in particular by how easily it comes apart. I have high standards in this regard. I told a friend that I will only buy or recommend servers that I can install, remove, disassemble and repair with one hand, a TSA-approved butter knife and no instructions,” Yager writes.

Yager writes, “Apple’s Xserve Xeon falls apart with the slightest touch, and I like that. I don’t mean that it’s fragile. Like most of what Apple has made, Xserve Xeon is obviously ruggedized to survive a fall… Apple troubled to make connectors that friction fit very tightly, yet don’t need to be wiggled loose… The chassis was designed first, and the logic boards were designed to fit it. What a concept.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Tony W.” for the heads up.]

Related articles:
Apple shows off new Xserve with Quad 64-bit Intel Xeon processors at LinuxWorld – August 17, 2006
Bear Stearns: Apple’s new Mac Pro, Xserve pricing well below comparable Dell systems – August 09, 2006
Apple introduces Xserve with Quad 64-bit Intel Xeon Processors – August 07, 2006

15 Comments

  1. ” I told a friend that I will only buy or recommend servers that I can install, remove, disassemble and repair with one hand, a TSA-approved butter knife and no instructions,” Yager writes.”

    In fact, Yager is also very well known for his one hand requirement in his personal life as well. You have to maintain a high set of standards.

  2. “In fact, Yager is also very well known for his one hand requirement in his personal life as well. You have to maintain a high set of standards.”

    Is this like, never use your left hand in the Middle East, or more like furry and blind?

  3. “Is my obsession with operator-centered design mine alone, or do people in the real world make buying decisions based on a server’s build quality? Do you have a 1U x86 box in your rack that you could disassemble and put back together, sans diagrammatic assistance, more easily than a kid’s bike? I know that’s desirable. I just don’t know whether anyone thinks that’s worth $2,999 when a perfectly functional, but horribly built two-socket x86 rack server can be had for half that. It is typical now that the minimum unit of field replacement is the entire system. Is that just the way of things?”:

    Since he is only using one hand to work on the server, can’t he use his cell with the other and call some IT professionals to get answers to these questions?

    No digg. Article incomplete.

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