NASDAQ sends Dell delisting notice

“The NASDAQ has alerted Dell and Novell, two tech stalwarts, that it is starting de-listing procedures. Nasdaq told Dell it has failed to meet requirements for continuing to be listed on its exchange,” Edward F. Moltzen reports for CRN.

Moltzen reports, “In a statement, Dell said it plans to seek a special hearing before a NASDAQ panel to explain its position. The request delays any action by NASDAQ for several months. ‘As anticipated, the letter was issued in accordance with NASDAQ rules due to the delayed filing of the company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended Aug. 4, 2006. Pending a decision by the panel, Dell shares will remain listed on The NASDAQ Stock Market,” the Round Rock, Tex.-based company said in a press release.”

“Under NASDAQ rules, a company must issue a press release announcing it has received a delisting letter from the stock exchange, or it can be delisted immediately without a hearing,” Moltzen reports.

Moltzen reports, “Dell faces a number of investigations into its financial reporting and accounting methods. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is conducting an “informal” investigation, the Audit Committee of Dell’s Board of Directors is investigating, and the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York has also subpoeaned Dell records going back to 2002, the company has acknowledged.”

“On Sept. 11, Dell issued a statement saying early investigations ‘have indicated the possibility of misstatements in prior period financial reports, including issues relating to accruals, reserves and other balance sheet items that may affect the company’s previously reported financial results.’ Earlier this month, Dell Chairman Michael Dell told reporters in New York that he anticipated a delisting process to begin because his company has not filed its required, quarterly 10Q report with the SEC as mandated by NASDAQ rules,” Moltzen reports.

Full article here.

Dell’s press release here.

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20 Comments

  1. John, anything having to do with the computer industry could be construed to having implications for Apple. Sometimes it can be a bit tenuous, as you have suggested.

    Dell is #1 in shipments of PCs – that makes any news about Dell of more interest.
    Apple received a similar delisting notice a while back and has similarly appealed.
    Apple and Dell are both ‘late’ due to “accounting irregularities”, deep similarity.

    And then there’s the Witch Hunt factor (which witch hunt?).
    HP – number two in PC shipments – has trouble at the top, too. But HP has not had a shoot-from-the-lip CEO like Michael Dell. They never suggested Apple close its doors.
    Lenovo, #3, recently had a battery fire at an airport. Sony battery, like those used in some Macs. Reported, but without the gloat. Neither Lenovo nor previous owner IBM ever made the rivalry personal.

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