Nine years ago today: Apple completes purchase of NeXT Computer

“The year is 1985 and Steve Jobs is in trouble, after hiring Sculley as new CEO of Apple he began to enter a struggle over power in an attempt to regain control over his beloved Apple. In a move that was strange to Jobs he was banished to the distant office known as ‘Siberia’ and it didn’t take long before he left,” Alex writes for World of Apple. “$7 million and seven employees later Steve Jobs had a new interest, NeXT Computer. They originally worked on PostScript like technologies, working closely with Adobe but they soon found direction. It didn’t take long before Apple targeted a lawsuit at NeXT and in January of 1986 it was agreed that NeXT would be restricted to the workstation market.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews reader “Hugh” for the heads up.]

MacDailyNews Note: Jobs brought with him many NeXT executives, who replaced their Apple counterparts. In effect, NeXT was paid to take over Apple while keeping the Apple name.

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43 Comments

  1. I was at the MacWorld where Steve was introduced, think Woz was also in attendence…. 9 months later I was at MacWorld Boston when he became iCEO. The NeXT announcement was a shock because everyone thought they were going to buy BeOS but the french guy (forget his name) wanted too much money… wow thank god he wanted too much money, we needed Steve back in charge.

  2. …:

    In October 1993 Sculley joined a company named Spectrum as their Chairman and CEO.

    Spectrum was already involved in a class-action lawsuit brought by investors for what would now be called “Enron-esque” behavior.

    By February 1994, Sculley quit the company and filed suit. Spectrum in turn sued Sculley, both actions later being dropped.

    In June of 1994 he went to work part-time at Kodak.

    In 1995 Sculley and his two brothers started a venture capital firm with their most notable investment being Live Picture.

    In February 1995 Sculley became CEO of Live Picture which filed for bankruptcy in May of 1999.

    He really has the golden touch, huh?

    *The above facts and many more are found in Apple Confidential 2.0 by Owen W. Linzmayer (and I can recommend it completely). I get nothing from the sale of the book, except knowing I may have helped educate fellow Mac users about the very interesting history of our favorite computer company.

    Hope this helps.

    ~M

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