Apple MacBook Pro, ExpressCard and EVDO

“Apple announced the MacBook Pro on January 10, 2006 and… we have already tons of emails and forum posts about the MacBook Pro and people were wondering how it would work with EVDO. Many people, even stated, until there was a solution to run EVDO on the MacBook Pro, that they were going to wait to purchase it,” EVDOinfo.com reports. “First the good news. Apple is NOT the first manufacturer to build ExpressCard into a laptop.”

The following models already use ExpressCard/34:
• Dell Inspiron 1300
• Dell Inspiron B130
• Dell Inspiron B120
• LifeBook N3511
• Toshiba Terca M3
• ThinkPad T32 (supports both PCMCIA & ExpressCard)
• Acer TravelMate 8204WLMi

EVDOinfo.com explains, “So, the good news, is that Apple is not the first and only vendor to standardize on this. Also, PCMCIA officials, expect that 70% of all laptops shipped next year will contain an ExpressCard slot. Since the MacBook Pro no longer has PCMCIA slot (PC Slot), the current crop of PC Cards (KPC650, PC5220, Novatel V620, PC5740, Merlin S620, AirCard 580), WILL NOT work in the MacBook Pro. The MacBook Pro uses a newer slot called the ExpressCard/34. This newer slot is smaller and not compatible with existing PCMCIA cards, so we have to wait for Kyocera, Novatel or Sierra Wireless to have compatible cards.”

MacDailyNews Note: EVDOinfo.com explains that EVDO or Evolution Data Only, Evolution Data Optimized, often abbreviated as EVDO or EV-DO is a fast wireless broadband access (3G with average download speeds of400K – 700K) without needing a WiFi hotspot. You are the hotspot. You can have fast internet access, anywhere. No need to find a hotspot. For example, get high speed internet access in a car, train, clients’ office, or anywhere you can open your laptop.

EVDOinfo.com advises that users bookmark their page and check back frequently. They will be testing different options along with reporting on Mac drivers and solutions. Also, they have a ExpressCard/34 EVDO Notification List that allows users to be notified as soon as an EVDO ExpressCard/34 solution becomes available. This page will constantly be updated with the options for MacBook Pro users looking to use EVDO on both Verizon and Sprint.

More info here.

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Related MacDailyNews articles:
VZAccess for Apple Mac OS X released for Kyocera KPC650 EVDO card (wireless broadband for PowerBook) – August 23, 2005

15 Comments

  1. Excellent to see the EVDO guys on top of this. I already ordered my MacBook Pro. I use the Verizon Broadband service, and it is excellent for all those times when WiFi is not available or bogged down [as it was at macWorld].

  2. “You are the hotspot”? What the hell does that mean? Let me take a look at that site…

    Oh. It’s cellular broadband. Thpfft. Whoopee. But that’s so much less sexy than “you are the hotspot”.

    Considering how crappy the cellular reception on my phone can be, I’ll pass on relying on cellular for my internet.

  3. Now I understand why FW800 is no longer important for Apple:
    Here are some facts: (from http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,4149,1472734,00.asp)

    ExpressCard will have the theoretical maximum throughput to transfer data at a whopping 250 MBps (actually, 500 MBps total; 250 MBps to the computer in one direction and 250 MBps to the card in the other). This is in comparison to the now seemingly sluggish 132-MBps PC Card standard.

    ExpressCard’s throughput is ideal for video transfers and uncompressed files. To compare it with throughputs you’re familiar with: Gigabit Ethernet has a throughput of 125 MBps, FireWire 800 runs at 100 MBps, and USB 2.0 can reach 60 MBps.

    So if Apple produces a FireWire 800 to ExpressCard connector, there should be no loss of speed at all!

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