“Whether it’s the need to protect their products’ security and integrity, or just a slimy business practice, Apple is one of the most prevalent of modern tech companies that are clamping down on third-party repairs of their devices,” Adam Westlake reports for SlashGear.

“Proponents of the ‘right to repair’ were alarmed earlier this week when leaked Apple service documents indicated that the latest MacBook Pros and iMac Pro would be left inoperable after repairs from unauthorized service providers,” Westlake reports. “Reports detailed that computers using Apple’s new T2 security chip — specifically the iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro — would need special diagnostic software if certain key components are replaced.”

Westlake reports, “Apple has yet to comment on these reports directly, but the teardown and repair experts at iFixit have some good news: this new diagnostics and repair software has not yet been released or activated, and third-party repairs on the 2018 MacBook Pro are still possible — for now.”

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MacDailyNews Note: Adma O’Camb writes for iFixit, “So why is Apple doing this? It could simply be a mechanism for tracking parts used by their authorized network, to check quality or replacement rates. It’s possible that units with swapped parts may operate normally, but still report a failure in Apple diagnostic tests for having ‘unauthorized’ components installed—much like earlier units did on earlier versions of AST for third party HDD/SSD, RAM and batteries. If it’s not, then we have a problem.”

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