“The critically acclaimed MacBook Pro with Touch Bar has fragmented the macOS base,” Ewan Spence writes for Forbes. “s Apple serious about rolling out the new technology across the macOS range, or is the Touch Bar, TouchID and the associated secure enclave destined to be another dead-end for Tim Cook and his team?”

“To be accepted the Touch Bar needs to avoid the fate of 3D Touch – a cute addition to iOS that can be used for secondary functions but one that can never be relied on to be present in a device,” Spence writes. “The technology is included in the iPhone 6S and iPhone 7 families, but is not present on the iPad or iPad Pro machines. It can also be found in the trackpads of the MacBook and MacBook Pro machines, but no developer can put a function under 3D Touch and not have it accessible through other methods in the UI.”

“The Touch Bar offered something new for the MacBook and macOS, but it remains a tantalising possibility rather than a sea-change in how users can interact with their machines. Apple did not capitalise on this potential at WWDC with new hardware and the next step forward for the Touch Bar is not likely to happen before the end of 2017,” Spence writes. “Until then the Touch Bar, TouchID and secure enclave remain curiosities for macOS developers that create fragmentation between Apple’s hardware and software.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Apple’s not “scared.” They’re just taking it slow. We expect to see a Magic Keyboard with Touch Bar to arrive later this year, perhaps in concert with the iMac Pro release.

3D Touch and Touch Bar functions are not meant to be the sole repositories of functionality. No sane macOS and/or iOS developer would put any function there that cannot be accessed elsewhere, too. 3D Touch and Touch Bar are helpers. Powerful timesavers for those who have them and use them.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Tom R.” for the heads up.]