“Steve Jobs minted Apple as a top American retailer by designing crisp, modern stores with designs reminiscent of the company’s products,” Jonathan O’Connell reports for The Washington Post. “But as Apple moves to turn its stores into experiences — places for concerts, art exhibitions and photography classes — the tech giant has begun to pursue distinctive, yet familiar, buildings its customers might admire as well.”

“In the District, the company has set its sights squarely on the Carnegie Library in Mount Vernon Square,” O’Connell reports. “Apple officials say they plan to restore the building to its original grandeur and outfit Carnegie as a place to hold a slate of free, open-to-the-public concerts, art exhibitions, workshops for teachers and coding classes for children.”

A rendering of Apple’s vision for a restored Carnegie Library in Mount Vernon Square. Under Apple’s plan, the 114-year-old building would host concerts, performances and education open to the public. (Image: Apple Inc.)

A rendering of Apple’s vision for a restored Carnegie Library in Mount Vernon Square. Under Apple’s plan, the 114-year-old building would host concerts, performances and education open to the public. (Image: Apple Inc.)

 
“‘This is a way of creating a reason to come to the store, to touch and feel our products, but also to have an engaging experience with someone who is passionate about the same thing,’ said B.J. Siegel, Apple Retail’s senior design director,” O’Connell reports. “Finding historic buildings with stories rooted in their communities are part and parcel to the experience Apple is trying to create, Siegel said. The company in recent years has opened stores in a former restaurant bay in New York’s Grand Central Terminal, a Depression-era brick storefront in Brooklyn and a 130-year-old former bank in Paris.”

Read more, and see the proposed interior of the store, in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: That one’ll be palatial!

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Ladd” for the heads up.]