“Some of Silicon Valley’s biggest names have joined the court fight against President Trump’s immigration restrictions, as heavyweights like Apple, Google and Facebook warned that the limits could hurt the country’s economy,” Carlos Tejada and Paul Mozur report for The New York Times. “In a filing to a federal appeals court dated Sunday, nearly 100 technology companies argued that Mr. Trump’s temporary ban on all visitors from seven predominantly Muslim countries would hurt their businesses and violate both immigration law and the United States Constitution.”

“A lower court on Friday temporarily halted crucial parts of the ban, but the Trump administration said it would fight to have them reinstated,” Tejada and Mozur report. “In addition to Apple, Facebook and Google, major technology names that signed the brief included Microsoft, Uber, Twitter, Airbnb, Intel and Snap, the parent of Snapchat. A few names from outside the technology field, like Levi Strauss, the jeans maker, and Chobani, a yogurt company, also signed the brief. Separately, a group of prominent Democrats also protested the ban in a court filing.”

“The filing is likely to fray already tense relations between Mr. Trump and the technology industry. Its most prominent figures largely backed Mr. Trump’s rival, Hillary Clinton, in last year’s election campaign,” Tejada and Mozur report. “The filing is also likely to set off speculation about why some companies did not sign the filing. Prominent technology names that did not sign include Oracle, the big database company; Hewlett-Packard, the computer maker and tech services company; and Tesla, the electric-car company.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: As always — but, regarding Apple, even more now — God forbid any Islamic terrorist attack takes place in the U.S. now, lest Apple et al. be blamed.

Some people have said that I shouldn’t get involved politically because probably half our customers are Republicans… so I’m going to just stay away from all that political stuff.Apple CEO Steve Jobs, August 25, 2004

SEE ALSO:
Apple, Google, others draft joint letter regarding President Trump’s executive order, ‘Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States’ – February 2, 2017
Apple mulls legal options against President Trump’s executive order, ‘Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States’’ – February 1, 2017
President Donald Trump’s next immigration policy to target what Silicon Valley fears most – January 31, 2017
President Trump’s travel ban stirs little outcry beyond Silicon Valley – January 30, 2017
Tim Cook: Apple does not support President Trump’s executive order, ‘Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States’ – January 30, 2017
Tech industry frets over possible H-1B visa program changes under President Trump – January 28, 2017
President Trump eyes an H-1B visa aimed at ‘best and brightest’ – January 27, 2017
Silicon Valley uncertain after Donald Trump wins U.S. presidency – November 10, 2016
Silicon Valley donated 60 times more to Clinton than to Trump – November 7, 2016
99% of Silicon Valley’s political dollars are going to Hillary Clinton – October 25, 2016