“iOS 10 was, by the standards of performance and stability that I expect from an Apple release, pretty rubbish,” Adrian Kingsley-Hughes writes for ZDNet. “And the four updates that Apple pushed out in October didn’t really bring back what I’d lost in the upgrade from iOS 9.”

“But finally, iOS 10.2 seems to bring the performance and stability that Apple users both expect and deserve,” Kingsley-Hughes writes. “While 10.2 is undoubtedly welcome, it does raise some questions about quality standards at Apple.”

Kingsley-Hughes writes, “iOS 10 went through an extensive beta program — both by developers and the public — and despite the fact that Apple has almost total control over the hardware and software ecosystem, it still took the company an additional three months to deliver what feels like a fully usable operating system.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Many of the iOS 10 issues were with new hardware (iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus) which begs the question: How much time does Apple’s iOS team really have with the final hardware that ships right round the time as their annual OS release is set to occur?

What if new hardware and iOS releases were differently timed, say, new iPhones launch in September and usual, but new iOS releases arrive in January (new year, new OS)? Would that make more sense and improve the quality of Apple’s software releases?