Apple CEO Tim Cook displeased with President Trump’s restrictions on temporary worker visas

President Trump on Monday signed a proclamation to suspend the issuance of certain temporary worker visas through the end of 2020. The proclamation applies to H-1B visas, H-2B visas, H-4 visas, L-1 visas and certain J-1 visas.

Brett Samuels for The Hill:

H-1B visas are used for skilled workers and are common in the tech industry and is the largest visa program of those included in Monday’s order as its recipients can stay for multiple years. H-2B visas apply to seasonal workers. H-4 visas are given to spouses of H-1B visa holders. J-1 visas are given to researchers, scholars and other specialized categories such as au pairs, while L-1 visas are used for executives transferring to the United States from positions abroad with the same employer. Roughly 300,000 J-1 visa recipients come to the U.S. every year, according to the American Immigration Council.

“Temporary workers are often accompanied by their spouses and children, many of whom also compete against American workers. Under ordinary circumstances, properly administered temporary worker programs can provide benefits to the economy. But under the extraordinary circumstances of the economic contraction resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak, certain nonimmigrant visa programs authorizing such employment pose an unusual threat to the employment of American workers,” the order reads.

The restrictions are set to remain in place for the rest of the calendar year and can be extended… Trump has also directed aides to work on longer-term reforms to the immigration system. The president is pushing for a more merit-based system that would distribute H-1B visas based on which applicants received the highest wage offers… The president is also pushing to close loopholes that allow companies to outsource labor to foreign workers…

The order does not apply to those already in the United States, and it gives the Trump administration some leeway in making other exceptions. For example, immigrants applying for visas to provide labor “essential to the United States food supply chain” are exempt. Individuals “whose entry would be in the national interests” as determined by the federal government are exempt as well.

Apple CEO Tim Cook displeased with President Trump's restrictions on temporary worker visas. Image: Apple CEO Tim Cook
Apple CEO Tim Cook
Apple CEO Tim Cook voiced his displeasure via Twitter: “Like Apple, this nation of immigrants has always found strength in our diversity, and hope in the enduring promise of the American Dream. There is no new prosperity without both. Deeply disappointed by this proclamation.”

MacDailyNews Note: The U.S. Presidential Proclamation, in full:

Proclamation Suspending Entry of Aliens Who Present a Risk to the U.S. Labor Market Following the Coronavirus Outbreak

Issued on: June 22, 2020

The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) has significantly disrupted Americans’ livelihoods. Since March 2020, United States businesses and their workers have faced extensive disruptions while undertaking certain public health measures necessary to flatten the curve of COVID-19 and reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The overall unemployment rate in the United States nearly quadrupled between February and May of 2020 — producing some of the most extreme unemployment ever recorded by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. While the May rate of 13.3 percent reflects a marked decline from April, millions of Americans remain out of work.

In Proclamation 10014 of April 22, 2020 (Suspension of Entry of Immigrants Who Present a Risk to the United States Labor Market During the Economic Recovery Following the 2019 Novel Coronavirus Outbreak), I determined that, without intervention, the United States faces a potentially protracted economic recovery with persistently high unemployment if labor supply outpaces labor demand. Consequently, I suspended, for a period of 60 days, the entry of aliens as immigrants, subject to certain exceptions. As I noted, lawful permanent residents, once admitted pursuant to immigrant visas, are granted “open-market” employment authorization documents, allowing them immediate eligibility to compete for almost any job, in any sector of the economy. Given that 60 days is an insufficient time period for the United States labor market, still stalled with partial social distancing measures, to rebalance, and given the lack of sufficient alternative means to protect unemployed Americans from the threat of competition for scarce jobs from new lawful permanent residents, the considerations present in Proclamation 10014 remain.

In addition, pursuant to Proclamation 10014, the Secretary of Labor and the Secretary of Homeland Security reviewed nonimmigrant programs and found that the present admission of workers within several nonimmigrant visa categories also poses a risk of displacing and disadvantaging United States workers during the current recovery.

American workers compete against foreign nationals for jobs in every sector of our economy, including against millions of aliens who enter the United States to perform temporary work. Temporary workers are often accompanied by their spouses and children, many of whom also compete against American workers. Under ordinary circumstances, properly administered temporary worker programs can provide benefits to the economy. But under the extraordinary circumstances of the economic contraction resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak, certain nonimmigrant visa programs authorizing such employment pose an unusual threat to the employment of American workers.

For example, between February and April of 2020, more than 17 million United States jobs were lost in industries in which employers are seeking to fill worker positions tied to H-2B nonimmigrant visas. During this same period, more than 20 million United States workers lost their jobs in key industries where employers are currently requesting H-1B and L workers to fill positions. Also, the May unemployment rate for young Americans, who compete with certain J nonimmigrant visa applicants, has been particularly high — 29.9 percent for 16 19 year olds, and 23.2 percent for the 20-24 year old group. The entry of additional workers through the H-1B, H-2B, J, and L nonimmigrant visa programs, therefore, presents a significant threat to employment opportunities for Americans affected by the extraordinary economic disruptions caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.

As I described in Proclamation 10014, excess labor supply is particularly harmful to workers at the margin between employment and unemployment — those who are typically “last in” during an economic expansion and “first out” during an economic contraction. In recent years, these workers have been disproportionately represented by historically disadvantaged groups, including African Americans and other minorities, those without a college degree, and Americans with disabilities.

In the administration of our Nation’s immigration system, we must remain mindful of the impact of foreign workers on the United States labor market, particularly in the current extraordinary environment of high domestic unemployment and depressed demand for labor. Historically, when recovering from economic shocks that cause significant contractions in productivity, recoveries in employment lag behind improvements in economic activity. This predictive outcome demonstrates that, assuming the conclusion of the economic contraction, the United States economy will likely require several months to return to pre-contraction economic output, and additional months to restore stable labor demand. In light of the above, I have determined that the entry, through December 31, 2020, of certain aliens as immigrants and nonimmigrants would be detrimental to the interests of the United States.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including sections 212(f) and 215(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) (8 U.S.C. 1182(f) and 1185(a)) and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, hereby find that the entry into the United States of persons described in section 1 of Proclamation 10014, except as provided in section 2 of Proclamation 10014, and persons described in section 2 of this proclamation, except as provided for in section 3 of this proclamation, would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and that their entry should be subject to certain restrictions, limitations, and exceptions. I therefore hereby proclaim the following:

Section 1. Continuation of Proclamation 10014. (a) Section 4 of Proclamation 10014 is amended to read as follows:

“Sec. 4. Termination. This proclamation shall expire on December 31, 2020, and may be continued as necessary. Within 30 days of June 24, 2020, and every 60 days thereafter while this proclamation is in effect, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Labor, recommend any modifications as may be necessary.”

(b) This section shall be effective immediately.

Sec. 2. Suspension and Limitation on Entry. The entry into the United States of any alien seeking entry pursuant to any of the following nonimmigrant visas is hereby suspended and limited, subject to section 3 of this proclamation:

(a) an H-1B or H-2B visa, and any alien accompanying or following to join such alien;

(b) a J visa, to the extent the alien is participating in an intern, trainee, teacher, camp counselor, au pair, or summer work travel program, and any alien accompanying or following to join such alien; and

(c) an L visa, and any alien accompanying or following to join such alien.

Sec. 3. Scope of Suspension and Limitation on Entry. (a) The suspension and limitation on entry pursuant to section 2 of this proclamation shall apply only to any alien who:

(i) is outside the United States on the effective date of this proclamation;

(ii) does not have a nonimmigrant visa that is valid on the effective date of this proclamation; and

(iii) does not have an official travel document other than a visa (such as a transportation letter, an appropriate boarding foil, or an advance parole document) that is valid on the effective date of this proclamation or issued on any date thereafter that permits him or her to travel to the United States and seek entry or admission.

(b) The suspension and limitation on entry pursuant to section 2 of this proclamation shall not apply to:

(i) any lawful permanent resident of the United States;

(ii) any alien who is the spouse or child, as defined in section 101(b)(1) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1101(b)(1)), of a United States citizen;

(iii) any alien seeking to enter the United States to provide temporary labor or services essential to the United States food supply chain; and

(iv) any alien whose entry would be in the national interest as determined by the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, or their respective designees.

Sec. 4. Implementation and Enforcement. (a) The consular officer shall determine, in his or her discretion, whether a nonimmigrant has established his or her eligibility for an exception in section 3(b) of this proclamation. The Secretary of State shall implement this proclamation as it applies to visas pursuant to such procedures as the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Labor, may establish in the Secretary of State’s discretion. The Secretary of Homeland Security shall implement this proclamation as it applies to the entry of aliens pursuant to such procedures as the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, may establish in the Secretary of Homeland Security’s discretion.

(i) The Secretary of State, the Secretary of Labor, and the Secretary of Homeland Security shall establish standards to define categories of aliens covered by section 3(b)(iv) of this proclamation, including those that: are critical to the defense, law enforcement, diplomacy, or national security of the United States; are involved with the provision of medical care to individuals who have contracted COVID-19 and are currently hospitalized; are involved with the provision of medical research at United States facilities to help the United States combat COVID-19; or are necessary to facilitate the immediate and continued economic recovery of the United States. The Secretary of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security shall exercise the authority under section 3(b)(iv) of this proclamation and section 2(b)(iv) of Proclamation 10014 to exempt alien children who would as a result of the suspension in section 2 of this proclamation or the suspension in section 1 of Proclamation 10014 age out of eligibility for a visa.

(ii) Aliens covered by section 3(b)(iv) of this proclamation, under the standards established in section 4(a)(i) of this proclamation, shall be identified by the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, or their respective designees, in his or her sole discretion.

(b) An alien who circumvents the application of this proclamation through fraud, willful misrepresentation of a material fact, or illegal entry shall be a priority for removal by the Department of Homeland Security.

(c) Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to limit the ability of an individual to seek asylum, refugee status, withholding of removal, or protection under the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, consistent with the laws of the United States.

Sec. 5. Additional Measures. (a) The Secretary of Health and Human Services, through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall, as necessary, provide guidance to the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Homeland Security for implementing measures that could reduce the risk that aliens seeking admission or entry to the United States may introduce, transmit, or spread SARS-CoV-2 within the United States.

(b) The Secretary of Labor shall, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, as soon as practicable, and consistent with applicable law, consider promulgating regulations or take other appropriate action to ensure that the presence in the United States of aliens who have been admitted or otherwise provided a benefit, or who are seeking admission or a benefit, pursuant to an EB-2 or EB-3 immigrant visa or an H-1B nonimmigrant visa does not disadvantage United States workers in violation of section 212(a)(5)(A) or (n)(1) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(5)(A) or (n)(1)). The Secretary of Labor shall also undertake, as appropriate, investigations pursuant to section 212(n)(2)(G)(i) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1182(n)(2)(G)(i)).

(c) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall:

(i) take appropriate action, consistent with applicable law, in coordination with the Secretary of State, to provide that an alien should not be eligible to apply for a visa or for admission or entry into the United States or other benefit until such alien has been registered with biographical and biometric information, including but not limited to photographs, signatures, and fingerprints;

(ii) take appropriate and necessary steps, consistent with applicable law, to prevent certain aliens who have final orders of removal; who are inadmissible or deportable from the United States; or who have been arrested for, charged with, or convicted of a criminal offense in the United States, from obtaining eligibility to work in the United States; and

(iii) as soon as practicable, and consistent with applicable law, consider promulgating regulations or take other appropriate action regarding the efficient allocation of visas pursuant to section 214(g)(3) of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1184(g)(3)) and ensuring that the presence in the United States of H-1B nonimmigrants does not disadvantage United States workers.

Sec. 6. Termination. This proclamation shall expire on December 31, 2020, and may be continued as necessary. Within 30 days of the effective date of this proclamation and every 60 days thereafter while this proclamation is in effect, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Labor, recommend any modifications as may be necessary.

Sec. 7. Effective Date. Except as provided in section 1 of this proclamation, this proclamation is effective at 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on June 24, 2020.

Sec. 8. Severability. It is the policy of the United States to enforce this proclamation to the maximum extent possible to advance the interests of the United States. Accordingly:

(a) if any provision of this proclamation, or the application of any provision to any person or circumstance, is held to be invalid, the remainder of this proclamation and the application of its provisions to any other persons or circumstances shall not be affected thereby; and

(b) if any provision of this proclamation, or the application of any provision to any person or circumstance, is held to be invalid because of the lack of certain procedural requirements, the relevant executive branch officials shall implement those procedural requirements to conform with existing law and with any applicable court orders.

Sec. 9. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This proclamation shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This proclamation is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-second day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand twenty, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-fourth.

DONALD J. TRUMP

36 Comments

  1. Ah, more of Cook’s sanctimonious blather about the huge value of “diversity” (read: cheap labor).

    Since well before the election, I’ve been explaining Mr. Trump’s position and why the likes of Tim Cook supported his crooked, perennial failure of an opponent:

    For Silicon Valley and Apple’s Tim Cook, it’s all about H-1B visas and cheap labor.

    American companies want skilled labor as CHEAPLY as possible. That’s a main reason why Tim Cook, Apple and other tech firms backed the loser Clinton – they wanted unlimited H-1Bs to continue, so they can pay Ajeet from India half what they’d have to pay Mike from Michigan who can’t find a job after graduating from college and has to live in his parents’ basement because Apple got Ajeet from India to do it on the CHEAP.

      1. Going straight to name calling isn’t dealing with the issues.
        IN fact, it seems the throwing out the “Fascist” moniker are acting more “Fascist” than those being called.

        Not all immigration programs are good and not all immigration programs are bad.
        If you do the research you’ll find that the H1-B program is being used to pay those immigrate workers less than US workers, oppressing the H1-B workers as they can’t switch jobs easily and would have to put up with oppressive work environments to maintain their H1-B status.

        Please do your homework before jumping to conclusions that “ALL” immigration programs are good for the H1-B holder or the legal immigrants/US workers.

        If you do, you’re just buying into the propaganda and being used.

    1. Hypocrisy?

      The Executive Order comes from the son of a woman who spoke English as a second language and arrived in the US with $50 and no job skills in the middle of the Great Depression. She displaced American workers laboring for low wages until she caught a rich American. She had three “anchor babies” before she finally sought US citizenship.

      Her mother-in-law also came to America as a dependent spouse after her husband was deported from Germany for being a draft dodger.

      Two of her daughters-in-law were also immigrants who entered the country with work visas. One of them had three “anchor babies” before she became a citizen, the other only one. Both women brought in relatives through “chain migration.”

      1. Hypocrisy? Not exactly. Bullshit, disingenuous, loathsome virtue signaling with all the America was founded by immigrants crap? Yes.

        It’s been about a decade since Steve Jobs died. Tim the liar could have set up and trained an army of engineers by now. Instead he’d just rather send jobs overseas.

        Once again Trump is right, and Cook is whatever. In his own little self important pompous bubble. Go make a sad memoji.

          1. Not much difference there TXer.
            Of course they will pay some tax, maybe even enough to offset some unemployed American.

            I’m just kidding. They will never pay that much…..

      2. Hey. Different times. Two separate issues TxUser. Your argument has nothing to do with the other. Isn’t it important to promote American’s getting jobs at this point in time? Oh I forgot. You’re from an Ivy League school that grooms executives for corporate cronyism at the expense of the American worker while making the executives richer.

        1. Get your facts right. I attended a science/engineering school in the South.

          Where is your evidence that Apple—as opposed to some other employer—is paying its foreign-born engineers and executives any less than it pays the American-born? Where is your evidence that they are lying on the federal paperwork that claims they are hiring the foreign-born because no qualified American-born are available? You do know that federal law prohibits employment discrimination based on national origin, don’t you?

          1. What is your point?

            Jesus F’king Christ just get to the part where America (under Trump) is horrible and lazy and stupid and racist and we need foreigners to work all our jobs so might as well open the borders.

            I mean, really, that’s all your argument devolves to so get on with it.

          2. Hey Matlock where’s your evidence? As a matter of fact I have worked in staffing for many Fortune 500 companies so I think it’s safe to say that the jobs should be going Americans when they could be. Period. Big whoop engineering school. You still have the same attitude as the elite . Based on your previous comments you acted like you were an expert in college admissions at Harvard (refresher below). Now you are an expert in H1B. Go back to slide ruler and HP calculator Dilbert.

            When you are talking about exclusive schools, those that receive hundreds of applications for each available slot, there is no question of admitting unqualified applicants. After weeding those out, there are still dozens remaining who are fully qualified for that one slot. The question then becomes, “Which of these applicants has the most to offer the university community?”

            In 1967, I entered what was, at the time, arguably the most exclusive university in the country. There were about 1200 undergraduates, of whom five or six were black and 235 were women. The academic pressure was such that 12 to 15 students committed suicide per year. One of my classmates became the Chairman of the largest American investment bank and another is still America’s leading venture capitalist. One of my roommates headed the National Endowment for the Arts for awhile. Most of us did quite well after college, but I have never met anyone who did not regret how totally isolated we were from real life for those four years.

            All of us would have welcomed Harvard’s approach to admissions.

            1. Thanks for the acknowledgment that there are highly selective universities outside the Ivy League. What all those colleges have in common these days is that they are seeking a diverse student body to prepare their graduates for the real world. They aren’t herding their students into a white ghetto bounded by the hedges around the campus. The graduates are trained to hire the best-qualified applicant for positions in their companies without limiting their choices due to race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.

              That means they reject quotas like the ones imposed by this Executive Order. The limit on L-1 visas means that a company like Apple that has its headquarters in the US but most of its operations and 60% of its sales abroad is effectively prohibited from hiring the most qualified company executives, if the best applicants don’t happen to be American citizens or permanent residents.

            2. USER:

              “They aren’t herding their students into a white ghetto bounded by the hedges around the campus.”

              Wow.

              “white ghetto” USER?

              Seriously, “white ghetto”?!?!?!

              Lately you have been boasting and posting the DEMISE of the white population in the USA. So, once again, what is your obsessive problem with white citizens and why do you continue to denigrate them with imaginary stereotypes?

              Certainly, qualifies you as a RACIST that HATES whites. You definitely have a PROBLEM.

              It’s OK. Don’t be late for your Antifa or BLM protest later today. If you get out in front you might score the latest iPhone and designer sneakers. Watch out for the flames, you don’t want to get burnt…🤣

            3. GeoB,

              I attended a university with actual hedges surrounding roughly 1200 white students and 7 black students. Less than 100 of my graduating class were female. If you think that is an imaginary stereotype, tough. It was my reality for four years.

              I think that almost any of my classmates would say that “white ghetto” is descriptive, not inflamitory. I also think most of them would agree that we would have emerged better equipped for the real world if our experience had resembled the real world more closely.

              The world has no more than 100 million white male Americans out of a population of 8 billion people. The proportion of white males even in America has been falling for decades and is currently 31%. You don’t have to like that, but you do have to live with that reality. Reserving 65% of executive positions for white American-born males, as is currently the case, is not sustainable.

              Forcing multinational corporations like Apple that carry on most of their business abroad to hire Americans who are less qualified than international applicants is a formula for forcing them to move even more of their operations overseas, not less.

      3. In addition, TxUser can’t argue on the merits of H1B vs. American worker so he resorts to arguments that have little to do with the issue at hand just like the sob story that Tim Cook resorted to about enduring America dream blah blah blah. Wait! I’m looking for the world’s smallest violin! I can’t find it! Oh well. Shall we all have a good cry together. Nice attempt at deception but we are not falling for it Tx User!

        1. When H1-B is used properly, the alternative is not an American worker but leaving the position vacant because there are no qualified applicants. What is your evidence that Apple—specifically—is not using the law properly? It does nobody any good to cut off Apple’s foreign labor supply if there aren’t enough qualified Americans to fill the shortfall.

          1. Uh, no it’s called supply and demand where college, junior college and vo-tech schools work together to channel people into those courses and positions.

            Of course if the positions are filled by foreigners, then there is no demand and no need to bother with all that.

            (I think SOMEBODY was on the public payroll too long…)

          2. Nope called lazy corporations and HR departments. It costs money to source top talent and or train people to do the job. It’s just easier and cost saving to import the talent. Lame excuse. Remember the laws are written for the corporations that are outsourcing over seas and depressing wages through H1B!

          3. USER: “I attended a university with actual hedges surrounding roughly 1200 white students and 7 black students.”

            Please explain how attending the most elite college in its day with seven black students co-mingling with white students protected by healthy hedges is somehow a ghetto?

            I’ll save you time, some people would interpret a RACIST REMARK.

            USER: “The proportion of white males even in America has been falling for decades and is currently 31%. You don’t have to like that, but you do have to live with that reality.

            As Ronald Reagan famously said, “there you go again.” You proved my point beautifully, thank you. You seem to celebrate and enjoy the declining white population worldwide, for whatever reason.

            Once again you have a problem of accusing me that I have a problem with the shift in white population. And once again you have ZERO evidence to prove your FALSE allegation.

            How I feel on shifting populations race numbers, I will quote a famous commercial in the 1970s: “it’s not nice to fool with Mother Nature.”

            USER: “Forcing multinational corporations like Apple that carry on most of their business abroad to hire Americans who are less qualified than international applicants is a formula for forcing them to move even more of their operations overseas, not less.”

            Just WRONG on so many levels. No one in President Trump’s administration is forcing Apple to leave the USA. Quite the CONTRARY, President Trump is urging Apple to bring back manufacturing and JOBS to the USA. Prime example is the the president visiting the Mac Pro facility in Austin with Cook.

            If you remember history the passing of NAFTA by President Clinton opened the floodgates to allow Apple to move jobs out of the USA.

            It is not a surprise a supporter of Cook would defend the indefensible…

        2. “TxUser can’t argue on the merits of H1B vs. American worker so he resorts to arguments that have little to do with the issue”

          Very well said Bill and astute observation. USER does it regularly. When he can’t argue with specific facts in a reply, he deflects to an off topic obtuse point to push his liberal agenda further.

          Exhibit A: His response to you at 4:39 Wednesday is a classic example.

          But my absolute favorite is when anyone bombards him with a tedious litany of facts, quotes and links — he cannot dispute and he knows it — simply gives up raising the white flag and posts along the lines of everything in your post is false.

          I love total victories…👍🏻🤠

      4. Do you have a problem with directly answering posts with an on topic rebuttal?

        Certainly you do!

        You continue to drift into DEFLECTION LAND and sorry to say you can’t handle the truth.

        Around here, we all know that…

  2. Tim Cook – “There is no new prosperity without both”. This, coming from a guy who never once lost a paycheck these last three to four months… or his job… and his livelihood… or living off his retirement investments in order to pay the bills of today, as opposed to living off the fruits of his investment labor to enjoy the leisure of retirement tomorrow.

    Trump is just looking out for the AMERICAN worker, all 40 million of them, who were displaced and lives, livelihood and income disrupted by so called government health experts who didn’t have a clue and still don’t with regard to Corona Virus.

    When America gets back to where she was economically before Covid-19, the workers VISA’s restrictions will then be lifted and Cook can get back to hiring his precious international labor who will undoubtedly make more then the paltry 2% increase in five years of black staffers at one of Cook’s local USA Apple stores!

    Until then, Cook needs to keep that Virtue Signaling hole in his face shut and sit this one out!

  3. A lot of those foreigners happen to be Chinese spies. Tim Cook as a colossal ass. He has squandered all the goodwill that Apple once enjoyed.

    Steve Jobs had many talents, but choosing a successor is not one of them.

  4. My Dad got into radio when tubes where the “new thing”. In the 1930’s RCA needed a large number or high frequency radio engineers when very few existed. So they opened schools to train them. It was done again in the 60’s with mainframe computers.

    Why don’t those Silicon Valley billionaires spend $50 or a$100 million to educate the kind of people they want. Which will be more diverse – 100 engineers from India or 100 engineers from across the US?

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