Fit of new Nike Adapt Huarache shoes are controlled via Apple iPhone, Apple Watch, and Siri

Nike Adapt Huarache offers preset modes, and iPhone and Apple Watch app and support Siri Shortcuts.
Nike Adapt Huarache offers preset modes, and iPhone and Apple Watch app and support Siri Shortcuts.

Via Nike:

When it hit shelves in 1991, the Nike Huarache introduced a radical new approach to containing the foot. The neoprene bootie and exoskeletal upper offered a snug feel and a deft balance between a constant hug and lace-based customization. Now, with the introduction of the Nike Adapt Huarache, those traits are augmented by Nike FitAdapt technology, an intelligent platform that updates and evolves along with the user. The latest iteration of FitAdapt allows for a wider array of personal preferences amid various environments and situations — a key revolution given the multi-purpose nature of contemporary lifestyle footwear.

The aesthetic of the Nike Adapt Huarache takes loose inspiration from its namesake. Branding is minimal and aquatic odes (the original neoprene bootie was derived from a water ski) define both colorways and the articulation of the new shoe’s outer shroud.

Above this layer sits exposed elements of the Nike FitAdapt lacing system. The technology, which is run from a midfoot motor, is controlled by a multi-faceted Nike Adapt app. With the app, wearers of the Nike Adapt Huarache are greeted by a universal login (consistent for all Nike FitAdapt product — current and future), a themed interface specific to the Huarache and a number of preset fit recommendations for foot type and activity. The functionality of the app can also be driven by Apple Watch and Siri, two advances that support on-the-go shifts.

Wearers can choose preset modes or create their own custom fit and light combos. Siri Shortcuts support custom commands for an individual's most used features of the show.
Wearers can choose preset modes or create their own custom fit and light combos. Siri Shortcuts support custom commands for an individual’s most used features of the show.

MacDailyNews Note: Nike has not released prices for these smartshoes, but Nike’s 2016 HyperAdapt 1.0 retailed for $720. This January, the Nike Adapt BB shoe with power-lacing tech sold for around $350.

5 Comments

        1. True.

          A similar thought occurred to me not long ago. On a business trip, we stayed at a relatively posh hotel in the US where the conference was held. The enormous public restroom had:

          a ceiling full of fluorescent lamps burning nonstop
          a spigot sensor that was so annoying it would dispense water only after waving hands for several seconds
          a bay of noisy blow dryers and sensor based towel dispensers that almost worked, several were jammed
          the thinnest toilet paper i have ever seen in my life
          pathetic foamy soap from a cheap plastic dispenser, this one manually operated

          In short, it was very similar to a poorly automated factory, totally uncomfortable and unpleasant, with questionable value for all the battery powered gadgets and sensors, with zero effort put into thinking about the end user.

          On vacation at a significantly cheaper French boutique hotel, the experience was completely opposite. The one sensor in the room illuminated the light when opening the door. Instead of being an annoying sensor fight, the lovely brass faucet allowed the user to select water flow and temperature. The soft terry towels were stacked neatly in a basket atop a bed of lavender. Instead of smelling like hospital disinfectant, the room smelled of lovely provincial herbs. It was nearly silent instead of sounding like a wind tunnel. The room was simple and small but more than adequate for the job, and infinitely more comfortable.

          I think there is a cultural problem in the US that drives needless complications and costs while totally ruining what could be a pleasant place. I don’t even think Americans realize how much they overpay for the illusion of high tech efficiency which in the end is neither more efficient nor effective.

          Apple too is driving in this, in my opinion, the wrong direction. Totally inadequate attention placed on end user experience.

  1. I wouldn’t touch Nike anything with a 10′ pole, its an anti-American company, profiting of the ignorant people that like to overpay for something with a swish on it..

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