Time for Apple to redefine the iPad?

“It’s about time the iPad got a little love,” Dan Moren writes for Macworld.

“Back in 2012, I decided to experiment with working from the iPad. For three days, I used my iPad for all the tasks for which I’d normally turn to a Mac,” Moren writes. “And while I found I could do nearly everything, my conclusion was that the iPad wasn’t quite ready to replace my Mac.”

“While the iPad hardware has gotten more powerful, and we’ve seen better apps appear, my experience working with the iPad today didn’t feel appreciably different from that experiment three years ago,” Moren writes. “I think it’s up to Apple to put forth a more compelling vision of what the iPad is now.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Larger display, faster, more RAM, split-screen multitasking, Force Touch, and maybe even a cool stylus that only Apple could invent. Ring it up!

SEE ALSO:

Apple’s 12.9-inch ‘iPad Pro’ will feature Bluetooth smart stylus, Force Touch, NFC and more, source says – May 29, 2015
Apple preps iPad dual-app viewing mode, ‘iPad Pro’ models, and multi-user support – May 21, 2015
Apple’s new Force Touch patent application reveals stylus, virtual paint brush, 3D buttons interactions – May 28, 2015
Apple’s forthcoming iOS 9 supports ‘iPhone 6s’ Force Touch – May 26, 2015
Apple patent application reveals work on Force Touch for iOS devices and more – March 5, 2015
Apple’s next-gen iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus to feature Force Touch – February 28, 2015

24 Comments

  1. More importantly, a version of iOS that takes advantage of the bigger screen and the power. And not the stacks of tiny stagnant app icons. I get it on the iPhone but on an iPad..? Why is it the exact same when the product is so different, especially in practice?!

  2. MDN’s take: Right on. That is my feelings. I don’t yet own one and with “hot spot” on my iPhone, my i7 MBAir provides me with the power to do occasional page size photoshopping, good size Excel files, occasional layouts and other tasks that have yet to be integrated into the iPad with a good feel as the writer mentions.

    I do use a few friends iPads to keep in touch with the real world out there, but the power is not there yet for me. Going from my MBAir to a friends iPad is not quite as bad but yet similar to going from a SSD drive back to using an HD.

    Apple needs to make the iPads take a leap like the MBAir did when it went to the i5 and i7. Using iPads for me is like going back to the original MBAir in power.

  3. “MacDailyNews Take: Larger display, faster, more RAM, split-screen multitasking, Force Touch, and maybe even a cool stylus that only Apple could invent. Ring it up!”

    Sounds like a Galaxy Pro.

    1. …except for the fact that the Galaxy tablet uses an ugly, kludgy, slow operating system with an app store full of malware and second-class afterthoughts to iOS apps.

  4. How about a better quality display, ensuring that backlight and screen tones are even on iPad? Many iPad units, since at least the Air, suffers notoriously from stupid LCD defects. Book spine effect, yellowing, backlight bleed–Apple is shooting itself in the foot by letting iPad quality slip. I want iPad to succeed, and Apple needs to focus on the basics again.

  5. More and MDM are wrong. The problem is not the iPad it’s the end user. The iPad is not for professional writers, the MacBook and Air are. It is for people who have jobs that don’t need to type in a lot of information and who move around a lot. I have been saying this from day one, and I got one the first day it came out. I have worked in construction, flying, boating and sales (thanks to my parents). I see great potential for an iPad in all of those jobs. There are apps for those jobs however small businesses follow big businesses in tech. This is why MS has failed for over a decade with tablets; they saw them a fancy laptops. Apple saw it as a consumer device. IBM is the first to see iPads as computers for jobs that can’t use laptops. They also have the skills to put them in large enterprises.

    The tech writers who can stop trying to make it fit their job will be the ones people will be reading when the iPad opens up new markets for computers.

    1. Before I would have said “Hell no” to a USB port, but a USB-C port might not be so bad. But then again I can’t think of any actual uses for it besides charging and very rarely connecting external monitors. We use the cloud for data. External hard drives and even USB drives are an unnecessary relic in today’s technology.

    2. Also, file systems on iOS are designed the way they should be. The necessity to manually manage files is a misperceptions of users who suffered from bad designs in Windows for too long. It is a mundane task that AI can handle, and there is no need whatsoever to have this accessible to the end user.

      1. I have a hard drive filled with movies ripped from DVDs. It would be nice to just plug it into a USB port and play them. As it stands, I either have to load them into iTunes and sync them to the iPad (not enough free space) or buy something like a Kingston Mobilite and connect the drive to that and then connect the iPad to the Mobilite via WiFi. A USB port would be so much more convenient.

          1. The Mobilite G2, plus a portable 1 TB drive is well under $100. The only disadvantage is the slow speed of WiFi passthrough. It is however a workaround required due to the incompleteness of iOS. iOS is only part of an operating system, you need a computer to properly utilize any iDevice. Access to a usable file system would turn iDevices into real standalone computers.

            1. The two are very similar with one substituting compactness for versatility. Neither would be necessary with a user accessible file system and an I/O port. Apple can keep its “walled Garden” approach to iOS and apps, which keeps us safe from malware and is truly appreciated by its users, but if Apple designs it correctly, access to and manipulation of ONLY data is enforced, there should be little or no threat from malware.

  6. Don’t need force touch..

    A stylus is a Stylus, doesn’t make any difference who makes it, or whose logo is on it.

    Larger display would make it more cumbersome to use..

    At this point, they may as well bite the bullet and make it a combo device, with a detachable keyboard, and trackpad..

    1. You think you don’t need force touch because you haven’t seen the added features it will provide in the OS that will be announced Monday, or the future OS’s that will drive that feature to necessity once all outdated models that don’t carry it become irrelevant for updates.

      Apple won’t make drastic changes to the point force touch is required quire yet, because most of their users will be using old devices that don’t have it. But once all the older devices stop getting updates at some point, and the only devices that will get future update are ones with force touch, I assure you that feature will be just as important as the touch screen itself.

    1. No, you can already make iPhone calls, send texts and iMessages, etc from the iPad by signing into the same iCloud account. It already piggybacks those functionalities from the iPhone just like the watch does. If you give the iPad cellular technology them all the sudden AT&T will force you to have a separate minutes and texting plan for iPad, and would also argue that the watch needs its own SIM card and plans.

  7. I agree. The new iPad Pro should be like the Surface 3 Pro. It already has a bigger screen, and more ram and the new A9. Why not add a detachable keyboard like the Surface 3 Pro and give it what the Surface 3 Pro does not have, a USB-C connector for everything. And it will have what the 3 Pro does not have, iOS the most powerful mobil operating system instead of Windoz 8.

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