Ripping commercial Blu-ray disks to your Mac

“I’m only aware of one app that allows you ‘rip’ commercial Blu-ray discs to your Mac and that’s Leawo‘s Blu-ray Ripper,” Dennis Sellers writes for Apple Daily Report. “It works well, but takes a looooong time to rip a single Blu-ray.”

“I inserted a Blu-ray of the excellent film, “Jeremiah Johnson,” and ripped it to my iMac’s hard drive. The movie is just under two hours long. Ripping it took 2.x times its viewing length — about five hours. This is on a new iMac with 32GB of RAM. If you use Blu-ray Ripper, you might want to insert the disc to be ripped before you go to sleep for the night,” Sellers writes. “On the other hand, the software does let you enable streaming MP4 Video while a disc is being ripped.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Note: Leawo Blu-ray Creator for Mac retails for US$39.99.

40 Comments

      1. Scroll down to answer by “Shaun”

        MakeMKV and Handbrake. Fraction of the time/effort.

        I have never used it, or tried to make it myself.. But I have seen *claims* of an applescript that once the BD is inserted, rip and then convert/shrink the file down without user involvement (outside of running the script)

        Honestly I haven’t actually ripped a BD in a while, I have everything backed up now that I own. But there was a time where I was ripping 5+ a week for backups..

        I still have a PC, and it ended up just being easier to rip/convert (in one pass) with the PC instead of the Mac.
        But not once did it take 5 hours per BD… thats insane. I don’t think I have ever had to rip anything that took longer than 2 hours total.

        Apple IMO should have “supported” Blu Ray, just not shipped any macs with a Blu ray drive. Maybe not officially supported, but helped make it easier for those that wanted to use Blu Ray with their mac.

        Yes Optical is dying, but it’s not dead.

    1. It’s only the best way to get the highest quality HD video in your home.
      Apple users don’t hear much about it because elitists at Apple want you to buy the lower quality videos that they sell. It’s all about Apple profits; not what is best for Apple users.

      1. “It’s only the best way to get the highest quality HD video in your home.”

        True.

        “Apple users don’t hear much about it because elitists at Apple want you to buy the lower quality videos that they sell. It’s all about Apple profits; not what is best for Apple users.”

        Here’s the thing, if you’re concerned enough with quality to buy/rent Blu-Ray, then where would Apple even come into play? If you’re concerned with quality, you deal with the whole system, the player, the amp, the screen, the speakers, the environment, etc… It would be pretty bassackwards to watch a Blu-Ray on a tiny MacBook screen all the while preaching about quality.

        Having Blu-Ray inside a Mac makes little sense in this context. Be that as it may, there are plenty of 3rd party Blu-Ray drives, and contrary to this article, multiple apps that can rip. You can also play and write Blu-Ray.

        1. In case you forgot, Apple is (at least, used to be) the premier platform for creating and editing videos. iMovie HD and iDVD were way ahead of the curve. Then Apple actually dumbed down iMovie and never updated iDVD to the next logical step which would be to support Blu-ray creation. Apple is going backward! And IMHO, it is all about Apple profits.

          1. What the heck does this have to do with your original comment?

            While I don’t particularly care for what Apple did with iMovie, iDVD reflected a trend in regards to people no longer producing DVDs on the consumer level while at the same time many 3rd party tools came to the party.

            The Mac is just as capable of Blu-Ray creation from beginning to end with plenty more options as they were with DVD creation.

            If Apple were on the quest for profits only, they wouldn’t be leaving Blu-Ray creation on the table for 3rd parties to pick up… assuming there was actual demand for this for consumers.

            Regardless, this has nothing to do with Apple skipping over Blu-Ray as a delivery mechanism for TV and movie content and going right to streaming/downloadable content.

            1. “What the heck does this have to do with your original comment?”

              This was a direct response to your comment “Having Blu-Ray inside a Mac makes little sense…”

              Please pay attention to the conversation.

            2. Irony:
              Quoting a statement out of context by omitting the phrase “in this context”.

              You wrote:
              It’s only the best way to get the highest quality HD video in your home.

              I replied:
              It would be pretty bassackwards to watch a Blu-Ray on a tiny MacBook screen all the while preaching about quality. Having Blu-Ray inside a Mac makes little sense in this context.

              You then went on to criticize Apple in regards to “video creating and editing”, prefacing it with “In case you forgot”.

              “Please pay attention to the conversation.”

              Try reading what you write sometime.

    2. Being literal:

      “Blu” refers to the blue spectrum of light. This is not technically accurate, but close enough for average tech users. To quote Wikipedia:

      “A blue laser is a laser that emits electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength between 360 and 480 nanometres, which the human eye sees as blue or violet.”

      That EM frequency range encompasses the near-ultraviolet spectrum (which we humans cannot see) on up through far blue, which we’d see as an indigo shade. These lasers are used for Blu-ray because they can write and read finer data elements on a disk than early/conventional optical disc lasers that used longer frequency light within the red spectrum of light.

      Sony coined and trademarked the term ‘Blu-ray’ for their blue laser write and read disc technology. Why Blu-ray is a huge PITA to use is due to Sony’s bad attitude toward their customers as expressed by their treating of all their customers as default criminals. (This is an extremely common theme within our current age of Bad Biznizz and represents corporate paranoia, self-loathing and self-destruction. All of this is of course my consistent personal perception of this situation). Therefore, Blu-ray uses three forms of DRM (Digital Rights Manglement, as I call it). One form requires that any time a Blu-ray disc is played that Sony surveillance be applied by way of connecting to them over the Internet. If Sony doesn’t like how you’re using their technology, they can theoretically BRICK your Blu-ray device. Isn’t that nice of them? The further two forms of DRM involve encryption that stop you, again theoretically, from copying the disc as part of your ‘fair use’ rights as owner of a disc. Again, how nice of them?

      As a result of all this anti-customer garbage, it takes some skill and hackery to work around Sony’s DRM crap in order to use their technology without their surveillance and without preventing you from making backups and copies of your owned media to be played on your other devices.

      In Windows OS, all the Sony DRM crap is built-in, for better or worse. In OS X, none of Sony’s DRM crap is built-in. Steve Jobs suitably called Blu-ray ‘A Bag Of Hurt’ and refused to screw over Apple customers with Sony’s default-criminal DRM crap. Thank you Steve Jobs, I approve.

      Therefore, on OS X, applications like Toast with the added Blu-ray plug-in are required to write Blu-ray. Applications like MacGo Blu-ray Player (which increasingly sucks less with time) are required to play Blu-ray discs on a Mac. And applications like Mac BlurayRipper Pro are required to backup and copy your owned Blu-ray discs.

      Note that I am NOT addressing the pirating of Blu-ray discs, which is indeed a crime and is highly unadvisable. Don’t feed Sony’s paranoia by actually BEING a criminal.

      1. I reject your premise that Blu-ray is a “huge PITA.” This is what Apple would like you to believe but it is simply not true. Apple is king of DRM. Just look at everything in the iTunes store. Want to play your iTunes music on some other MP3 player? Oh yeah, you can’t! Talk about “huge PITA!”

        1. Wrong.

          1. Apple hates DRM. Apple has always hated DRM. It makes their job tougher and offers them no extra benefit. Apple only ever applied DRM because record labels like Sony required them to.

          2. You can play music purchased from the iTunes Store on any MP3 player you want… after you convert it to MP3. And last time I looked iTunes will convert it for you.

          3. Blu-Ray is a bag of hurt. For the reasons clearly given by Derek.

  1. If the BR disc is dirty (to the LASAR not the human eye) or if the BluRay player itself is in some way deficient it WILL take forever to read the date. Hence it will take a long time to RIP.

        1. You’ll have a great old time when your data dies with your computer drive. I’ve watched it happen over and over and over and over and I have zero sympathy if you haven’t backed up. Blame YOU, not your drive. All drives drop dead eventually. But you’re too busy to PLAN AHEAD. Sadly very typical these sad days of short term thinking, long term disaster, same old story.

    1. When is comes to video discs, “backup” is code for “transferring to another device.” This is really what we all want — the ability to watch the content that we paid for on any of our devices.

  2. MakeMKV –> Handbrake

    MakeMKV pulls it off at about 2x real-time and Handbrake encodes it at about the same speed…this is all on a Mac Pro 3,1…2.8Ghz x 8-core, 16GB ram.

    1. using the purchased version of makemkv. use it to break down music DVD’s into single chapters. have done a 1K concert. works fine. bought it to break down BD’s. will be trying the stones BD “from the vault”. the purchased version will let you rip BD after the beta is over. all this just because i want to watch BD in the retina iMac.

      the external BD drive is an LG slim portable BD writer. as a bonus, it will write m-discs in case there is need to do some real archiving.

    1. And have a huge stack and shelves and shelves of discs lying around your house what a waste of space. And ugly too. Encode them put all of your movies, music and photos on a couple of 2 gig hard drives. Plug in an apple tv and stream. Takes one shelf vs dozens.

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