Apple opens testing facility to reporters, details exhaustive iPhone 6 Plus durability tests

“Whatever problems a handful of users have had with their new iPhones bending, Apple insists that its quality assurance standards are rigorous, and that any problems people have had are extremely rare events,” CNBC reports.

“Apple went further this afternoon, inviting a CNBC reporter into its testing lab to see the machines it uses to test its products,” CNBC reports. “The iPhone 6 is ‘the most tested product we have ever done,’ said Dan Riccio, head of engineering. The phone was tested 15,000 times before being released, he said.”

CNBC reports, “The company also reiterated that only 9 people have complained about the phone bending.”

[protected-iframe id=”245a936ec401c2ee0fc83b5a539869eb-17146794-18685410″ info=”http://player.theplatform.com/p/gZWlPC/vcps_inline?byGuid=3000313669&size=530_298″ width=”530″ height=”298″]

Direct link to video here.

“I saw four tests performed in Apple’s labs, just a few blocks away from the main building of its sprawling Cupertino campus, which I’ve outlined below,” Lauren Goode reports for Re/code. “These are just a few steps the company says it takes; the short tour didn’t include tests around display strength, water-resistance or other wear and tear benchmarks.”

“First was the ‘sit test.’ Dan Riccio, Apple’s senior vice president of hardware engineering, says this test is the one that is most relevant for customers with concerns about the phones bending in pockets. There are three parts to the sit test. The first part simulates a typical user sitting down on a hard surface, the second simulates someone sinking into something softer like a couch, and finally there’s what Riccio calls a ‘worst-case’ tests, where someone would have a phone in their pocket and sit down on a hard surface at an angle,” Goode reports. “Riccio says the company cycles through these, ‘thousands of times.'”

Read more about the tests and see photos of the test in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Okay, who took over Apple PR and started to actually do, you know, effective public relations?

[Thanks to MacDailyNews readers too numerous to mention individually for the heads up.]

39 Comments

    1. Yup, exactly. Kudos to Tim and the executive management team for doing this to quickly squelch the echo chamber, but it is really only benefiting the competition whom you absolutely know are scrutinizing everything. Hopefully a major upgrade was already planned for shortly after the upcoming announcements so this intelligence gathering is nearly moot.

    2. Yeah, but actually it was a truthful video:

      If you apply enough pressure (how much) at a focus point off center (or on) you will bend the unit under pressure. This is true of all physical objects. It’s amazing that the so called Technology Press picks up on this and propagates it like they do. It says so much about about the total sham these websites are, nothing they publish can be taken for fact. The guy in the video should be sued for impersonating an intelligent person.

      1. Unfortunately, it wasn’t just the tech press reporting the lies it was many mainstream television and online publications. I guess it was also reported on local news. Did they retract this evening or say they were blundering idiots for not researching the validity of the claims? The answer is not to my knowledge. The fact that they showed a video clip from some random guy on YouTube and reported that as fact without researching the validity of the claims is completely unethical, unprofessional and dangerous. The producers of these programs and websites should be fired or voluntarily quit because of their incompetence.

        1. This is true. The BBC reported on this last night and the anchor woman stated the phones bend “if placed in a pocket or held too tightly”. Yes, that’s right, she said “HELD TOO TIGHTLY”.

          Now where was their fact checker that day? In the john dumping their tiny brain in the bowl I suspect.

  1. I’m going to assume they use machinery to do the ‘sit’ test.. Aluminum is a fairly malleable metal and it becomes more so with heat which it also easily absorbs and dissipates. I wonder if they also simulate the amount of body heat (plus heat generated by the phone that does not dissipate while in a pocket) that the phone would be subject to while being carried in a pocket.

      1. All I’m saying is if the ‘sit’ test does not take into account retained heat and added body heat while performing the test, the results will not reflect real-world conditions. As I noted above it is a good heat conductor and will warm up quite easily, especially since there is nowhere for the heat to dissipate to while pocketed. The temperature of the testing area may also change the results good or bad.

        1. The fellows who run the reliability labs are incredibly crafty folks. Think Dick van Dyke in “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” running into the house and grabbing the chimney flue. They construct all manner of testing machines and analyze how they compare with real world usage. If they weren’t in there testing upcoming products all the time it’d be awesome to allow more visitors to visit.

        2. My businesses employ many materials science engineers, so does Apple. I assure you the full testing parameters will include a complete environmental assessment. In addition, labs will have a specification for for environmental control. I see a calibrated surface plate as the foundation for one of the tests, this is your first indication they are serious about their lab and measuring environment.

  2. I was at an Apple store today and noticed that some plus units looked like they had been bent slightly near the volume buttons. I assumed some bozos where in the store and had done their own bend tests. Now I just read that the guy who posted d the video that started this whole thing mentioned that the phone he tested was slightly bent already. Maybe there’s a batch that was baddly manufactured to begin with.

    1. He actually said that it was already bent before he bent it further? What a tool. Does this Einstein know how many billions of dollars he helped to lose the last two days all because of his little prank? There’s a lot of people that lost a lot of money because of that worm and other trolls. What an idiot.

  3. Ah from the horse’s mouth: “The company also reiterated that only 9 people have complained about the phone bending.”

    The person saying this isn’t a jouranalist so I’ll believe him. In doing so, one can certainly see “bendgate” under a new light. The way that this has been picked up and hyped by the media is akin to dropping the soap and bending over to pick it up.

    That’s how low the modern day jouranalists have stooped. Maybe they should be heading overseas since they have severed any thread of respect they may have had.

    1. Not that I care, but I’d look at the part of the country this guy is from, his social network and what social marketing agencies can be found in a 10 miles radius of his home. But that’s just me.

      1. In general I agree however one problem for me is that I have never seen an instance where Apple over embellishes, deceives or lies about any of their products. In fact I find their PR dry and boring, just the facts and no more.

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