Apple’s upcoming OS X Photos app appears to focus on iOS 8 editing features, not pro tools

“During the 2014 WWDC keynote, Apple demoed a very early build of its upcoming Photos application for Mac. The app will be available next year for OS X Yosemite, but for now all we really know is that its arrival will bring about the end of both iPhoto and Aperture,” Mike Beasley reports for 9to5Mac. “That news drew the attention of everyone who uses either of those applications, with many saying Apple no longer cared about pro-level users.”

“In an attempt to quell the outrage, Apple released a statement to Ars Technica saying that Photos for Mac would still support pro features, but what exactly constituties a ‘pro-level’ feature in Apple’s eyes?,” Beasley wonders. “According to the statement, Photos will feature support for third-party plugins, library search, and advanced editing. If that sounds a little vague to you, it’s probably because Apple doesn’t really want to answer the question.

Beasley reports, “Like it or not, Apple is making big changes to its lineup of photo editing products —though, given what we know of the software so far, it seems many power users will end up firmly on the ‘or not’ side.”

Read more in the full article here.

Related articles:
How iCloud killed iPhoto and Aperture – July 1, 2014
Apple merges iPhoto, Aperture into a single new, free Photos app – June 30, 2014
Apple axes Aperture and iPhoto, says new Photos app for OS X is the future – June 28, 2014
Apple pulls plug on Aperture – June 27, 2014
Apple may have finally solved photo storage hell – June 23, 2014
Apple unveils new versions of OS X and iOS, major iCloud update with iCloud Drive – June 2, 2014

22 Comments

  1. “If that sounds a little vague to you, it’s probably because Apple doesn’t really want to answer the question.”

    Or it’s too early in the development cycle to comment? When has Apple ever detailed features for applications 8-10 months out?

  2. If Photos supports plugins then you can run the existing version of Aperture and with a little luck the 3rd party plugins will show up for Photos and bridge the gap.

    At least that would be my hope.

  3. wow they even copied the negative slant from 9to5mac. the article i read on macrumors read “Aperture Replacement ‘Photos’ to Offer Image Search, Editing, Effects and Plugins” and sounded awesome.

  4. No one should be the least surprised that Apple has abandoned still another of its pro user customer base. It’s all about pop culture and consumers who are only interested in mobile gadgets. Being “good enough” is their mantra and Tim Cook finds it so easy to meet that standard that he needn’t even show up at Cupertino. Which, if made permanent, could perhaps make a difference in the direction of the once great company. But, that’s not happening because board members and lemmings galore seem entirely satisfied. So be it. Very sad, dark times. Appealing to a fickle consumer hasn’t ever worked very well in our long experience and with all the alternatives of flashy gizmos galore, Apple Inc. is at great risk as their previous commitment to break through technology, pro strength hardware, software, and innovative OS’s disappears in the rear view mirror.

  5. Since they are replacing Aperture and iPhoto, it will be reasonable to expect a product inline with Aperture now. However, expect it to cover the mobile devices that would extend the product to mobile devices. I would wait until more is known than condemn a product this far out, then again you receive less clicks to the sites.

    1. It would also have been reasonable to assume that a program that was promoted from Version 1.0 on as a page layout app would retain page layout abilities across a revision from v4 to v5. Pages users who made that assumption were disappointed. When we expressed our disappointment, we got 1-star feedback and were called whiners and trolls.

      First, like Aperture users, we were told that nothing important was being dropped. We responded by providing 3-page lists of missing features. The Aperture user community can’t do that, because nobody (including Apple) knows exactly what Photos.app will include.

      Ah, but none of the missing Pages were important, because the critics didn’t use them. To me, the ability to produce a document with two stories on the same page, both of which continue to subsequent pages, isn’t exotic. That’s just something that every other program promoted for page layout has done since 1985. Some of the features that Aperture may drop are in that same class.

      But all the missing features would be coming back in subsequent upgrades! No, they didn’t. If they haven’t by now, they never will, because page layout is no longer part of Pages, which has been repurposed as a collaborative IOS/OSX/iCloud word processor. The missing features in Aperture will be gone because they aren’t essential to a collaborative iOS/OSX/iCloud image program. There will be plugins, but those won’t be allowed to alter the basic functionality of the program.

      Well, don’t worry, there are similar programs out there, we were told. Yes there are, but none with the particular features that made us choose Pages or Aperture in the first place, and none that will allow us to simply transfer over our existing data from one proprietary file format to another.

      Finally, we were told to just keep using v4. It wasn’t going away. It would work forever. Well, sorry, but some important features will be going away as soon as Yosemite, barely a year after the iWork upgrade. A program so highly integrated with OS features is particularly sensitive to OS changes. Any files we have created with v4 in the interim are just as dead as those we created before the v5 announcement. There are just more of them. Aperture users can easily create terabytes of such data in a year, making delay even more costly.

      It is simply ridiculous to suggest that they can continue using an old program on an old OS on an old computer forever; these are professionals that must compete with other pros using the latest and greatest.

      Again, I would like to believe that Photos will be a seamless upgrade from Aperture, but my experience with Pages suggests otherwise. Apple can reassure its users by promising an upgrade path, but it has not yet done so. It has promised a different program with a powerful but undetermined feature set, which is not all that reassuring.

      1. There seems to be a pattern with Apple and software. Bring out a new product, do some marketing, bring in some customers, get them hooked because it integrates so well with OSX…then allow marketing to languish, allow development to slow, watch as customers drift away or stop buying the product, then announce that ‘low & behold’ nobody is using our product therefore we will axe it.
        Dear Apple, this is a vicious circle and it takes money, determination and commitment to keep the balls rolling.
        It’s truly a crying shame that with $150 billion in the bank, that a little love cannot be spread on niche areas.
        Hey maybe Photos will be the all singing, dancing photo app, but as TX suggests, the history of Apple says different.

        1. Well, I sorta agree, but the fact is that Aperture couldn’t keep up with Lightroom’ s development pace and was really only filling a niche requirement needed by pro’s with vast librarys of photos. I know of two such folk who swear by Aperture for stock management, but not for photo editing. Lightroom got a better database management(not perfect) capability but Aperture went backwards on editing – its barely at Lightroom 2 levels. I can see why they might want to start again with a product aimed at unifying the iOS and Mac workspace without all the kludges to do the same thing with existingp software.

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