iPhone 6: How Apple kills off Samsung to dominate Android

“For Samsung, the strategy has been to give customers two, and at times, three products from which to choose before Apple releases its new iteration,” Wall Street Playbook writes for Seeking Alpha. “To achieve this, Samsung management has put in place a 6 to 8 month product refresh cycle. They know that Apple couldn’t or would choose not to follow suit. Apple, meanwhile, refreshes/updates its iPhone and other devices every 12 to 18 months.”

“Apple investors have a very important reason to remain excited. Aside from the fact that Apple management has finally embraced the idea of a bigger phone, statistics show that several iPhone users have not upgraded their phones in quite some time,” WSP writes. “Morgan Stanley (MS) conducted a recent study, which revealed that many older generation iPhones remain in circulation, including the three-year old iPhone 4. Interestingly, the study highlighted that among the devices on the Verizon network, more than half of those devices were either iPhone 4 or the iPhone 4S. And that’s the same situation with AT&T.”

“This study, which suggests significant pent-up demand for customers who are in a position to upgrade to the iPhone 6, is why analysts didn’t care about Apple’s weak iPad results in its recent earnings report. From that standpoint, it’s only a matter of time before analysts figure out what this sort of pent-up demand may mean,” WSP writes. “It’s a good thing Samsung is selling its phones now. It will be hard to convince Android users not to switch to Apple.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: As we wrote on Friday:

An iPhone with a larger screen option will hurt Samsung immeasurably more than myriad, unending traipses through the legal morass.

28 Comments

      1. Alt+1 to Alt + 32
        ☺☻♥♦♣♠•◘○◙♂♀♪♫☼►◄╝‼¶§▬↨↑↓→←∟↔▲▼

        Some things, on Windows, require less effort.

        And yes, I own and love my Macs, but I’m not blinded by any manufacturer.

        1. Easy way on a Mac…

          Set up the Character viewer in your menubar. One time set up: go to Preferences->Keyboard->Show Keyboard & Character viewer in menubar.

          In the menubar select the Character viewer. From there you can browse thousands of symbols and emojis. Either copy and paste whatever you want, or drag and drop, or double click to insert it into your text.

          No need to remember which number represents which symbol, and there’s many more to choose from.

          You can also save your favorite symbols as favorites or browse your recently used symbols… like mine, the interrobang‽ ⸘Or en español‽

          It will also show you want the symbols look like in various fonts and where exactly the symbol is displayed (line/width/height).

          And there’s a search box so you can just type “note” and it will show you all the symbols and emojis for that.

          1. You do realize that type of application also exists in Windows. It is simply easier to use the Alt- if you are just typing and don’t need to keep a small notepad with favorite ‘symbols’ open all the time.

            1. It’s under Accessories->System Tools->Character Map. This brings up a small window that shows all the defined characters in any font you select via dropdown box at the top of the window. If you check the Advanced View checkbox it will also give you the options for selecting the character set for the selected font, search and group by.. When did you mention an option key modifier in the post I responded to?

            2. “You do realize that type of application also exists in Windows.”

              I can’t believe you’re comparing Character Map in Windows to Character Viewer in OS X, especially when this thread kicked off with “Some things, on Windows, require less effort.”

              First off, they’re totally different apps. Character Map in Windows is like the Keyboard viewer, only without an actual map of the characters. It doesn’t contain emoji, at all. You can’t mark any as favorites. There’s no dynamic searching. It’s got a totally ass-backwards method of inserting characters. You can’t view symbols by type (currency, math, etc…). No recently used. No ability to select a character and then view it in available fonts. In fact, you have to first select a font, and then select the character. If the font you first select doesn’t have the character, then you wouldn’t even know it existed. I could go on and on, but seriously… Character Map, even in Windows 8.1 feels like it was whipped up last minute to feature match in Windows 3.x and hasn’t been updated since.

              “It is simply easier to use the Alt-“

              Yes, on Windows it is because just looking at the Character Map app in Windows makes your eyeballs melt as if you were staring directly at the Lost Ark and even if you could look at it, it’s totally dysfunctional.

              “When did you mention an option key modifier in the post I responded to?”

              Just in my last comment. The comment was made that Some things, on Windows, require less effort. But that’s clearly in no way that any human would ever agree is the case comparing the Character Map app in Windows to the Character Viewer in OS X. The point was that Alt- was somehow easier. But that’s only if you want a micro-subset of characters, specifically these:
              ☺☻♥♦♣♠•◘○◙♂♀♪♫☼►◄╝‼¶§▬↨↑↓→←∟↔▲▼

              And that you know which keys they’re mapped to.

              However, that’s like saying that “special characters are easier on the Mac because you can generate them with Option-“… neither Alt- nor Option- is any easier, but on OS X there’s the Character Viewer is a bazillion times more powerful, with more symbols and emoji, and easier to use than the Character Map on Windows 3.x – 8.1.

              Sorry if I went off on a rant here, but this is precisely the type of issue that really gets to me… when people compare craptastic hardware and software (especially software so old that it’s indistinguishable from where it was in the early 90s) to quality hardware and software.

            3. “First off, they’re totally different apps. Character Map in Windows is like the Keyboard viewer, only without an actual map of the characters.”

              Looking over screen shots of the Mac equivalent I can see what you mean. And having a keymap does make it more fun.

              “It doesn’t contain emoji, at all.”

              This is unfortunately a non-standard implementation of Unicode or whatever the Mac calls the extension. All the emoji you mention are unique to the font sets used on Macs so are visible as simple ‘squares’ on non-mac devices. I agree it’s fun but too bad you can’t see it on other systems.

              “You can’t mark any as favorites.”

              Ok, point for Mac. 🙂

              “There’s no dynamic searching.”

              You’ll have to explain what you mean here and give an example.

              “It’s got a totally ass-backwards method of inserting characters.”

              This is probably just usage differences.

              “You can’t view symbols by type (currency, math, etc…).”

              Ok, this IS possible in Character Maps. Just choose “Unicode subrange in the “Group By” I mentioned before.

              “No recently used. No ability to select a character and then view it in available fonts.”

              I agree that is somewhat cool, but how is that useful when you’re actually creating documents outside of fine tuning design?

              “In fact, you have to first select a font, and then select the character. If the font you first select doesn’t have the character, then you wouldn’t even know it existed.”

              Don’t know what you mean by selecting the character after selecting a font since you can see the range once you change the font. Yes, you won’t see that character if it is not defined for that font. This is due to Windows using a relatively ‘standard’ font set and due to the designers of that font set not going that far. Kudos to Apple for making that consistent. Not any fault of the App in question though.

              “The point was that Alt- was somehow easier. But that’s only if you want a micro-subset of characters, specifically these:
              ☺☻♥♦♣♠•◘○◙♂♀♪♫☼►◄╝‼¶§▬↨↑↓→←∟↔▲▼”

              Yes, agreed.. That was the original point. 😀 To correct your misconception however, the Alt- is not limited to 0-255.. You can actually access ANY of the unicode characters by simply using the right number while keeping Alt down and releasing. Unfortunately the range above 255 is also difficult to display in forums like this.

  1. On the evil known as Windows, it’s alt-13 and alt-14 (literally hold down alt and type 13 on the number keypad, then let go of alt).

    On Mac, it’s in the character/keyboard viewer. On my iPhone, it’s a “shortcut.” 🙂

    1. Hmm, learn something new everyday. Thank you for reminding me of character keyboard viewer. 👍
      ♫♪♬♩♪♫♬♬

  2. Fact is iPhones generally last a long time and even when the OS is updated the devices remain usable for 3 years.
    There are a significant # of customers who don’t upgrade phones every 2 years. Unless the phone is damaged there is no compelling reason for them.
    Also with new plans coming out such as AT&T rent to own model, the longer you keep the phone the lower the overall cost. That wasn’t the case when the cost of the phone was baked into the plan.

    1. You bring up a good point.. However since there really is no study done as to what ‘older’ devices are still in use, you just have to go by what you hear from those around you and what devices you use.. Personally I have a Galaxy S II and that is about 3 generations and still more than useful for me. It’s very possible like Apple devices those from other Phone OEMs are lasting just as long, you just don’t hear about it as much.

  3. Yet another clueless comment about week iPad sell. On a six months basis, the iPad sold this year as many units as last year, same semester. Actually a bit more. These losers are just looking forward to see apple doing bad or what…?

  4. This article ignores the fact that many people hand their iPhones down to their kids, thus accounting for a large number of older iPhones on networks. The 4 and 4S were the first iPhones offered on Verizon, so when the parents upgraded, they passed their iPhones to their kids (not all cases, obviously, but in many). Plus, the iPhone 4 and 4S were some of the first offered for free with a new contract. Again, kids come into play here.

    While those 4 and 4S models are ripe for upgrading, don’t expect a mass upgrade if the parents aren’t up for an upgrade. And while the 6 will appeal to many, plenty more (like myself) don’t want a phablet in our pocket, and we may very well stick with the 5S.

  5. Samsung is finally seeing its strategy backfire: Consumers can’t upgrade a phone every 6-8 months. In the U.S. we’re locked into subsidized contracts (mostly), or (as in other places around the world) we pay full price for our phones. I’m not buying a phone for $500-$900 and then replacing it in 6-8 months just because the latest model makes a slight improvement to the processor, camera, etc.

    Apple, OTOH, paces its updates at a yearly rate for iPhones and as a result garners significant media hype leading up to the release (rumors), the actual release event coverage, and significant coverage after the event (long lines to upgrade, shortages of stock, reviews, etc.). Samsung enjoys none of this and even has to pay to create fake hype.

    The end result is no one really knew the Galaxy S5 came out, but everyone will know when the iPhone 6 is released. In fact, more people know right now about the iPhone 6’s rumors and speculation than do about the Galaxy S5’s specs.

    1. The point of Samsung putting out those phones may not be for a 6-8 month upgrade cycle but rather keep the product line fresh and up-to-date with their own innovations/features. It is entirely possible the goals for Apple and Samsung with their product lines are not the same.. Samsung may simply be appealing their intent to keep pushing ahead quicker than their competitors, thus the short refresh cycle.

  6. Still using my iPhone 4, it’s my iPod and emergency back-up phone, unlocked on a different network.
    When the iPhone 6 comes out, I’ll be handing in my 5 to get a discount, and buying on a new rent-to-own contract here in the UK, which will give me unlimited texts and minutes, with 5Gb/data per month.
    Can’t lose, really.

  7. This is what bums me out about this “pent-up demand”:

    It’s going to take me forever to get an iPhone 6, isn’t it? I’m not the kind of guy who’s willing to wait in line, so they’re going to run out and I’ll get put on a waiting list by my carrier and aw, crud.

    ——RM

  8. “���statistics show that several iPhone users have not upgraded their phones in quite some time,” WSP writes. “Morgan Stanley (MS) conducted a recent study, which revealed that many older generation iPhones remain in circulation, including the three-year old iPhone 4.…”.
    That statement is true for me. My iPhone is the 3GS, still placing and receiving calls as though it was new. Downside it battery life and there are nineteen productivity app that will not upgrade. So, with the iPhone 6 I will be upgrading. You see, I am a tight-wad, even with all the advances in the latest iPhone I did not see a compelling reason to upgrade this 3GS. Now there is a compelling reason.

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