OS X Mavericks Multiple Displays demoed on six 27-inch displays (with video)

“Now that developers have their paws on the developer preview of Apple’s OS X Mavericks, we’re starting to see demonstrations of the new operating system’s capabilities appear outside of the safety of Apple’s keynote address,” Meghan McDonough reports for Digital Trends.

“Via YouTube, one user with a sweet-looking six (!) 27-inch monitor setup goes through the pros and cons of Apple’s new full-screen app support within a multi-monitor configuration,” McDonough reports. “MrThaiBox123, the YouTube user who uploaded the video of Mavericks multi-monitor in action, demonstrates how a full-screen app in Mountain Lion would blank out all of the other displays except the one where the app was at full-screen.”

McDonough reports, ” In Mavericks, this doesn’t happen.”

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Read more in the full article here.

26 Comments

    1. I have two usage cases:

      Log file examination (especially Apache)

      Quick and dirty trimming of AV files in QuickTime Player – much greater finite control over placement of the play head when the window is absurdly wide.

      Beyond those two? Not so sure!

    2. Large contiguous spreadsheets in Numbers. Working with a single sheet (within which are tables) all visible at the same time, makes audit and analysis very quick. I stretch the spreadsheet across two monitors.

  1. Useful video thanks, seems that this way of working is better for multitasking with different apps, ultimately you can have one background spread across multiple monitors you just can’t change all at once, something that surely is just for aesthetic purposes!

    1. Yeah really, worrying about whether one large multi-screen wallpaper correctly matches consistently? Sounds like something Fandroid would worry over. I use two monitors and all this is a non-issue for me. I never stretch apps over two monitors as I don’t like the break line created by the right and left edge of the monitor frames. This guy points out the need for a 47″ or larger Retina Display monitor. I still can’t figure out why 30″ has almost disappeared. Waaay better then 27″.

  2. I think the restrictions brought up may be “stretching it” a bit. Not sure why with six monitors you’d need to stretch across two.

    I guess one thing lacking here is an example of your work flow that would be negatively impacted by the new changes.

  3. Give me a break. I guess I can see that you might want to have a window spread across more than one monitor, but honestly I can’t see wanting to do that much. It is a bit of a pain really. And the bit about wanting to have your desktop image spread across multiple screens? Get a life. If you have some functional reason why the new way of handling multiple monitors doesn’t work then ok, but just not liking how it handles the desktop picture seems a bit lame to me.

  4. So biggest problem is that you cannot have one large wallpaper across 6 display’s and applications don’t stretch across screens, oh well, that’s going to cause serious delays to the final build.

    Oh, sorry, I totally forgot that this is a developer preview, i.e., unfinished work. Lets not write it off too early!!

    1. Demoed.

      You notice part of the video where he opens the command center. You can drag and move applications anywhere and switch apps around desktops.

      Demoed in the keynote, too.

  5. This new way seems to work well. Fixing the full screen app issue which disabled other monitors is great. However many people still say they liked how multiple displays in SL worked the best. How did it work exactly?? I never used it cause I never need to.

  6. Hmm… after watching video it would seem the implementation in Mavericks is far more scalable and better. Sure, you can’t have one stupid desktop image span your 6 monitors but I use my desktop images to quickly tell which space I’m in so no loss here.

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