Apple TV dominates digital media receiver market with 71% share

“Tim Cook didn’t break much news Tuesday night at AllThingsD,” Philip Elmer-DeWitt reports for Fortune.

“But he did provide a new data point about Apple TV,” P.E.D. reports. “He said the company has sold more than 13 million — about half of them in the past year.”

P.E.D. reports, “According to Asymco’s Horace Dediu, Cook is not counting the first generation Apple TV (Jan. 2007 to Sept. 2010). If that model were included, according to Dediu’s estimates, the total would be closer to 19 million.”

Advertisement: Apple TV Digital Multimedia Receiver (MD199LL/A) only $95.98

Digital Media Receivers Market Share:
• Apple TV: 71% – More than 13,000,000
• Roku (U.S. only): 27% – More than 5,000,000
• Boxee Box: A1% – bout 200,000 (before it was discontinued last summer)

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: iCal sez:

Apple will dump Apple TV by year’s end. Despite much hype, the Internet TV set-top has been a bust.Phillip Swann, December 20, 2007

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Dan K.” for the heads up.]

27 Comments

    1. They’d have to copy the service and they already have “SmartTV” which runs on a variant of Android.

      Tim Cook’s comments were interesting, and were no doubt there as a strategic move to let content providers that users are quickly buying up Apple TVs as of late and that they should partner with Apple sooner rather than later.

    2. I’ve used and subscribed to Samsung’s streaming services – Not anymore man, that stuff is total and complete crap.

      Have a good evening.

  1. I love my 3 Apple TVs (2 at home and one for presentations at work). At $99 it is almost an impulse buy.

    While it doesn’t relly do much that other devices can’t do, it s just so freakin’ easy to use. This is Appe’s stealth product star.

    1. I own 2 AppleTV devices. Gave the 1st generation to my son to use.

      What is not discussed is the next steps in the rollout of what has been forced to be a “hobby”.

      • Why has Apple not opened the AppleTV to the app developers yet?

      • Apple is building billion dollar server farms (Some disclosed and others that know one is looking for) all around the world with solar panels and fuel cells. (Why?) Could it be that soon, Apple will offer personal iCloud storage for replay to it’s Apple iOS devices on demand?

      Billion dollar server farms being built and know one even thinks to ask Tim or Apple, “What are you going to do with all those server farms you are building?” “Think Different”! A VCR requires no agreements with media owners to record anything you can watch in your home and replay it from anywhere. Apple’s iVCR service will not either!

  2. This site just cracks me up. When it comes to market share, it’s just not important if Apple isn’t the market share leader (can you say iPhone?). But when Apple is the market share leader (can you say Apple tv?), it’s headline news! Gotta love MDN’s slant on how the world works!

    1. Hey Rick, I just had to sit around and listen to my niece and nephew extol their love of their new iPhones. These were their first Apple products and they just lauded over how smooth apps work compared to Androids, how they love getting iOS updates and being able to run the most up to date OS, security, and on and on.

      I’ve been trying to tell them Apple was vastly superior for the last decade, but they never ever heard my words.

      Suggest you maybe listen or better yet try an iPhone.

  3. They could have easily trebled the sales if the OS had been opened to developers….it would have made a huge impact in the living room and sold a ton more apps.
    But no, it’s this hobby that’s been waiting for what?? As someone above said $99 is pocket change, but $999+ full HD set is not. It doesn’t take an idiot to know which would sell more.

  4. Unfortunately for Apple, currently the digital receiver category has no value to Wall Street. The revenue numbers and unit sales aren’t large enough. Besides, instead of really pushing sales for AppleTV, Apple keeps calling it a HOBBY!! and slowly waiting for a rival major company like Samsung to jump in and quickly steal their market share.

    I remember a number of years back when I used to go to the Apple retail stores, they’d have an AppleTV set up and I almost never saw any consumers being interested in it. It was usually the emptiest area in the store. I won’t buy one because I can’t install PLEX or XBMC on the device. My Roku 3 with PLEX installed is really fantastic. All my 800+ HD video files are Matroska-wrapped and there’s no way I’d waste my time converting them to mp4s to run in iTunes. MKV files are the future as far as I’m concerned. So far, FireCore hasn’t been able to crack ATV3 and that’s a shame. I think Apple is missing a golden opportunity to build a huge lead in that device category, but that’s just how Apple is. Always laid back and never hard-selling anything. AppleTV is just too closed for what I need it for. And it’s too far removed from Apple’s iOS ecosystem to unlock the huge potential that would seem to be lurking just below the surface.

    1. I do think that Apple has been slow off the mark on Apple TV. It has huge potential to be much more than a set top box – games being only one part of a huge library of IOS apps and services for ATV. It is getting better and I hope for Apple’s sake they go balls to the wall on whatever they come up with…

    2. Apple could indeed be waiting for a big player to bring in a truely competitive product. That would be a good strategy because the value of what they bring will increase when consumers have something to compare it with. Apple probably has a ton of AppleTV improvements waiting to be released, but why give them now, when people’s awareness of the category is low and their disposable income is still going to iPads. Apple still has time on its side on this one.

    3. Yeah, but you’re either a niche bittorrenter or a prolific buyer of movies who has spend the time to rip them all to Matroska in the first place.

      I somehow think you’re the former and in that case, do you think Apple really considers you its main customer?

      Tim Cook kept talking about how Apple goes for the mainstream consumer as they want to make products for everybody. Most people don’t bittorrent. Most people don’t have massive libraries of movies in digital format. Lots of people still buy DVDs in the discount bin at WalMart.

  5. The TiVo sitting in my Living Room can DVR anything on my cable AND does the online streaming services. Content can be exported to my Mac via Toast Titanium and downloaded or streamed to any iOS device.

    Yes the interface could use an Apple overhaul, but the thing works as advertised. The difference between the TiVo and all the pretenders- a CableCard.

    If Apple would redesign the Apple TV to take a CableCard- which all cable operators MUST offer customers- you can get rid of your cable box and have an Apple quality TV experience.

    Using a CableCard in the current system would require a license of Windows Media components, probably having a lot to do with the fact we do not see a CableCard slot on our Apple TVs.

  6. More importantly, Apple is dominating online sales of Movies/TV shows at around 70% and also online rentals at about 45%. Those figures DO include game consoles, Amazon and Netflix.

    AppleTV is a peripheral in the Mac and iOS universe and requires little investment or risk. If Apple can figure out a way to open it up to 3rd party apps, it would take over the living room.

    1. I agree. I think Apple are most likely to release two products in the future, the current ATV but on steroids with powerful graphics and iOS compatibility and a full blown 4K TV with more refined features – i.e Siri being used to its full potential.
      Just thought of this ATV advert slogan “Let Siri take you on Safari”…

  7. OK, so can we please stop calling AppleTV “a hobby” now? The possibilities are wide open for Apple to steal the living room. Just make AppleTV’s software even better, open it up to devs, allow them to create beautiful TV apps, games, and more for a living room experience that integrates with the rest of the Mac/iOS/iCloud ecosystem.

    And most importantly, keep the price down. Who will want to buy a ginormous and overpriced Xbox One then?

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