How Tim Cook is like Steve Ballmer

“It’s worth pointing out that Apple is not the only big tech company where there seems to be a disconnect, at least a superficial one, between the doom-saying of some investors and the company’s financial performance,” Nick Wingfield writes for The New York Times.

“For many investors, Steve Ballmer, the chief executive of Microsoft, has long been one of tech’s favorite villains. His company’s stock has lost 43 percent in value since he got Microsoft’s top job on Jan. 13, 2000. Periodically, pundits, investors and even former executives call for Mr. Ballmer to get the boot,” Wingfield writes. “During the 13 years Mr. Ballmer has led Microsoft, though, annual revenue at the company has grown 221 percent, to $73.72 billion, and profit has jumped 80 percent, to $16.98 billion. In comparison, during Mr. Cook’s 20 months as Apple’s chief executive, the company’s annual revenue has grown 45 percent, to $156.51 billion, while profits have jumped 61 percent, to $41.73 billion.”

Wingfield writes, “It’s too soon to tell whether Apple can shake off the disaffection of investors. The case of Mr. Ballmer and Microsoft, though, suggests that a company can be stuck in investor purgatory for a long time even if it keeps up profit and revenue growth.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Cook is growing what Steve Jobs built. Ballmer is coasting on what Gates’ stole from Apple way back when. One company clearly has a bright future, the other has missed every major tech market for the last decade. Zune, Kin, Windows Phone, Surface, Vista, 8ista… the list of Ballmer’s debacles goes on and on.

On his watch, Tim forgot to have Forstall label Apple Maps “beta” and the new iMacs were two months late. That’s about the litany of his mistakes. Obviously, there are big differences between Tim Cook and Ballmer T. Clown.

31 Comments

    1. Other things were screwed up to. The lack of any good TV ads is killing the Apple image. Apple needs someone for PR. Tim Cook needs to focus. Sitting with the First Lady at the state of the union and pushing the Gay Rights stuff can be done out of the public view and pursued heavily after he retires from Apple.

    2. MDN left off the Browett hire. Even so, Cook has been doing well in my opinion. If you expect perfection, then you are doomed to bitter disappointment. Jobs was not perfect, either. I think that the fact that Apple is currently fielding its strongest ever set of products (with the exception of the Mac Pro!!) speaks for itself.

    1. Yes, indeed. However and most unfortunately, his stinch still lingers in the Apple stores. I am amazed every time I go to my local store how badly broken it remains. Advice overheard from the sales floor is so often wrong, wait times are increased, the customers frustration is so palpable that now it is an unpleasant experience just to be in the store to browse, but especially if you require assistance. I used to look forward to going there. Now I pass right by and thank God that I don’t have to go in there. The Ft. Lauderdale Galleria store is the one to which I’m referring. Even I couldn’t have screwed it up this badly!

  1. Even Steve Jobs brought in the Papermaster guy from IBM and got rid of him quickly when he didn’t fit! Tim Cook and Apple will be just fine. You really have to wonder why the media pay any attention to Wall Street after the mess they made in 2007-08!!! They really have no clue…….

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