Apple now worth twenty times Dell’s market value

On October 6, 1997, in response to the question of what he’d do if he was in charge of Apple, Dell founder and CEO Michael Dell stood before a crowd of several thousand IT executives and answered flippantly, “What would I do? I’d shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders.”

A little more than a month later, on November 10, 1997, new Apple Interim CEO (iCEO) Steve Jobs responded, speaking in front of an image of Michael Dell’s bulls-eye covered face, “We’re coming after you, you’re in our sights.”

On January 13, 2006, after a little more than eight years of hard work, Apple Inc. passed Dell, Inc. in market value, $72.13 billion vs. $71.97 billion at market close, respectively.

• 2X: On July 27, 2007, Apple’s value doubled that of Dell’s, $127.81 billion vs. $63.65 billion, respectively.

• 3X: On December 6, 2007, Apple’s market value passed 3 times that of Dell’s, $165.66 billion vs. $54.42 billion, respectively.

• 4X: On May 01, 2008, Apple’s market value quadrupled that of Dell’s, $158.66 billion vs. $38.97 billion, respectively.

• 5X: On February 12, 2009, Apple rose $2.60 to hit a market value of $88.37 billion or 5 times that of Dell’s $17.52 billion.

• 6X: On October 20, 2009, Apple rose $11.21 to $201.07 to hit a market value of $180.12 billion or more than 6 times that of Dell’s $29.97 billion.

• 7X: On January 26, 2010, Apple gained $7.57 to $210.64 to hit a market value of $189.72 billion or more than 7 times that of Dell’s current $27.03 billion.

• 8X: On May 21, 2010, Apple gained $1.95 to $239.74 to hit a market value of $218.12 billion or more than 8 times that of Dell’s current $25.84 billion.

• 9X: On June 1, 2010, Apple gained $6.89 to $263.77 to hit a market value of $240.01 billion or more than 9 times that of Dell’s current $26.29 billion.

• 10X: On September 9, 2010, Apple gained $1.60 to $265.37 to hit a market value of $242.43 billion or more than 10 times that of Dell’s current $24.21 billion.

• 11X: On September 23, 2010, Apple rose $3.79, or 1.32%, to $291.54 to hit a market value of $266.34 billion or more than 11 times that of Dell’s current $23.81 billion.

• 12X: On January 27, 2011, Apple rose $0.26, or 0.08%, to $344.11 to hit a market value of $317.02 billion or more than 12 times that of Dell’s current $26.02 billion.

• 13X: On August 26, 2011, Apple rose $9.86, or 2.64%, to $383.58 to hit a market value of $355.61 billion or more than 13 times that of Dell’s current $27.29 billion.

• 14X: On September 20, 2011, Apple rose $1.82, or 0.44%, to $413.45 to hit a market value of $383.31 billion or more than 14 times that of Dell’s current $27.15 billion.

• 15X: On February 15, 2012, Apple rose $14.03, or 2.75%, to $523.49 to hit a market value of $486.78 billion or more than 15 times that of Dell’s current $32.37 billion.

• 16X: On february 29, 2012, Apple rose $8.43, or 1.575%, to $543.84 to hit a market value of $505.75 billion or more than 16 times that of Dell’s current $31.35 billion.

• 17X: On March 12, 2012, Apple rose $3.27, or 0.60%, to $548.44 to hit a market value of $512.33 billion or more than 17 times that of Dell’s current $29.94 billion.

• 18X: On March 19, 2012, Apple rose $9.94, or 1.70%, to $595.51 to hit a market value of $553.29 billion or more than 18 times that of Dell’s current $30.61 billion.

• 19X: On March 26, 2012, Apple rose $10.93, or 1.83%, to $606.98 to hit a market value of $565.93 billion or more than 19 times that of Dell’s current $29.43 billion.

• 20X: Today, April 3, 2012, Apple rose $10.49, or 1.70%, to $629.12 to hit a market value of $585.93 billion or more than 20 times that of Dell’s current $29.21 billion.

AAPL vs. DELL market value 2007-present

AAPL vs. DELL market value 2007-April 2012
via Wolfram|Alpha

Apple is also a debt-free company and currently has well over three times in cash on-hand (now over $100 billion) than Dell Inc. is worth.

Hello, Mikey? Mikey? Miiikeeey?

Michael Dell

See AAPL and DELL quotes via NASDAQ here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Robert Gasiorowski” for the heads up.]

Related articles:
Apple now worth nineteen times Dell’s market value – March 26, 2012
Apple now worth eighteen times Dell’s market value – March 19, 2012
Apple now worth seventeen times Dell’s market value – March 12, 2012
Apple now worth sixeen times Dell’s market value – February 29, 2012
Apple now worth fifteen times Dell’s market value – February 15, 2012
Apple now worth fourteen times Dell’s market value – September 20, 2011
Apple now worth thirteen times Dell’s market value – August 26, 2011
Apple now worth twelve times Dell’s market value – January 27, 2011
Apple now worth eleven times Dell’s market value – September 23, 2010
Apple now worth ten times Dell’s market value – September 09, 2010
Apple now worth nine times Dell’s market value – June 01, 2010
Apple now worth eight times Dell’s market value – May 21, 2010
Apple now worth seven times Dell’s market value – January 26, 2010
Apple now worth sextuple Dell’s market value – October 20, 2009
Apple now worth quintuple Dell’s market value – February 12, 2009
Apple could buy Dell outright; Mac-maker has more cash on hand than Dell is worth – October 21, 2008
Apple now worth quadruple Dell’s market value – May 01, 2008
Apple now worth triple Dell’s market value – December 06, 2007
Apple now worth double Dell’s market value – July 27, 2007
Beleaguered Dell: Shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders – March 02, 2007
Biting words on Apple come back to haunt Dell – February 10, 2007
Steve Jobs emails Apple team: Michael Dell not the best prognosticator, Apple worth more than Dell – January 16, 2006
Apple now worth more than Dell – January 13, 2006

33 Comments

    1. Remember? That guy got busted for pot. As if computer users everywhere would be offended by a guy who smokes it. Personally, I think that was the beginning of the end for Dell because they were getting traction with that guy, but then they treated him like Michael Phelps.

        1. Reminds me of an old Emo Philips joke:
          “I asked my girlfriend the other day how much she loved me when we first met, and she said, “Zero.” So I asked her how much she loved me now, and she said, “A billion times that.””

          🙂

  1. This will NEVER get old to me. I remember the smug attitude and judgement Dell had when Apple was hurting. They didn’t wanna help. They wanted to watch us die a slow death as they circled us from above. Apple innovates, you steal- great business model, ass-clowns. Apple had just enough strength to put a bullseye on their back and while nursing themselves back to health. This scenario motivates me in business
    all the time.

    1. Dell didnt want to help? Why should they have? Why help out a competitor?

      How exactly could have Dell helped?

      Apple is strong and bigger than Dell exactly because Dell did not help them. They used their own talents and abilities to correct the serious internal problems that nearly brought Apple down.

      To suggest that Dell should have helped out Apple is ludicrous.

      1. Its far from ludicrous. You apparently know nothing about business. And you need to learn your history before you reply! Let me enlighten you-

        “Why help out a competitor,” you asked-
        1. A competitor doesn’t always necessarily make you an enemy. You can learn from your competitor. A competitor is in the same industry as you and can inspire, motivate and/or galvanize your team. Dell, HP, Sony and many other hardware companies have always tried to copy (or learn from) Apple’s model, product line, etc. Look at the iPad (tablet market) Its been around for the past 10 years and they all got it wrong until Apple created the iPad and now every tablet looks EXACTLY like the iPad. The other manufactures are now selling tablets (not as many as Apple) They learned how to build them correctly from their competitor – in other words, Apple helped out its competitor. Dell was a beast in the industry in 1997 and could have somehow found a way to help Apple and benefit themselves, 15 years ago.

        Read this article to get further understanding
        http://www.bothsidesofthetable.com/2010/12/27/why-you-should-make-your-competitors-your-frenemies/

        “How exactly could Dell have helped,” you asked –
        2. Microsoft was in the same shoes as Dell during that time -1997. Riding the wave of success from selling cheap Windows machines. Microsoft – A COMPETITOR, A COMPETITOR, A *&$@% COMPETITOR, made an investment in Apple through a brilliant proposal from the late, great Mr. Steve Jobs. Microsoft was a competitor the same as Dell- one sold software the other sold hardware. Because of Apple’s incredible turnaround and long-term success Microsoft won – they sold software to mac users and their investment of Apple stock grew. – Dell could have helped Apple and themselves the same way Microsoft did.

        Read this article to get further understanding
        http://www.forbes.com/sites/ericjackson/2012/03/01/steve-jobs-used-patents-to-get-bill-gates-to-make-1997-investment-in-apple/

        “Why should they have helped,” you asked-
        3. Dell doesn’t innovate sh*t, they copy and duplicate. Thats why they are not as successful as Apple. Apple innovates. Period. While on top of the PC world, Dell should have done exactly what HP did in 2004. Licensed Apple hardware (I know, Apple rarely does this). At the time it made total sense. Hp didn’t have to innovate, nor did Dell. License and sell a boat load of them. HP’s iPod accounted for 5% of total iPod sales at one time. Dell should have helped because Dell could have benefitted financially.

        4. Dell and Apple were both heavily invested and focused in the same market in 1997- Education. At the time Apple had 3 opportunities that Dell could have capitalized upon through investment and innovation.
        A. The eMate (a newton laptop) sold to schools and educational institutions.
        B. A PC Card that could have went into the Mac PowerPC boxes allowing Dell market share to grow and Mac users to have both a Mac and a Dell in one box. Orange PC did this and it was hurt due to marketing and low distribution.
        C. The Clones (Radius, Power Computing, Motorola, Daystar and Umax). Apple discontinued them because they competed against Apple instead of venturing into new markets so Apple could gain market share. Dell was in a unique position and could have made boxes that had more than one operating system option for the education market. Dell could have invested into being a Mac clone and might have been successful if they focused on a niche Apple was not pursuing.

        I could go on, but why…

        Again, don’t call something you dont understand ludicrous.
        In the words of The Rock –
        Know your role and shut your mouth!

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