Anobit acquisition keeps Apple ahead in flash memory

“The reported acquisition of Anobit should catapult Apple into the ranks of leading flash memory companies and mirrors what it has done with the A series of chips in its iPhone and iPad,” Brooke Crothers reports for CNET.

“It’s important to understand that Apple is not a flash memory neophyte, according to Gregory Wong, president of Forward Insights, a flash memory market intelligence company,” Crothers reports. “‘They already develop their own flash management tech,’ he said. Anobit, therefore, strengthens Apple’s existing in-house flash memory expertise, according to Wong.”

Crothers reports, “Anobit has developed a memory signal processor, or MSP, that is able to manage very high bit error rates and extend the life of flash memory devices, according to Wong… And that is important to Apple since practically all of its marquee devices now use flash as the storage medium, not traditional rotating drives. Add this burgeoning flash expertise to Apple’s formidable in-house system-on-a-chip know-how, as manifested in its A5 series of chips, and you have the makings of a chip design giant, albeit one deftly hidden inside of a device maker.”

Read more in the full article here.

Related articles:
Apple reportedly closes Anobit deal for $400-$500 million – December 20, 2011
Inside Anobit: Why Apple is investing in flash RAM technology – December 15, 2011
Apple to build semiconductor R&D center in Israel, sources say – December 14, 2011
Magical technology: Why Apple is buying Anobit – December 14, 2011
Apple moves to take over flash memory industry from Samsung – December 13, 2011
Analysts see competitive advantages for Apple in Anobit buy – December 13, 2011
Apple reportedly buying Israeli flash memory company Anobit for upwards of $500 million – December 13, 2011

6 Comments

  1. Add this burgeoning flash expertise to Apple’s formidable in-house system-on-a-chip know-how, as manifested in its A5 series of chips, and you have the makings of a chip design giant, albeit one deftly hidden inside of a device maker.”

    Nice turn of phrase.

  2. It seems inevitable that Apple will increasingly develop it’s own cutting edge technologies and keep them exclusively for their own products.

    When Apple uses off-the-shelf parts, others can shamelessly copy their products. Using exclusive parts which are not available to others will make it very much harder to copy Apple’s designs. That’s especially true when it comes to ultra-low power consumption components, which are the key to long operating times within a compact housing.

    1. Good, alanaudio! Yes. Also, part of a global strategy. Not just for pampered, whiny bourgeois city dwellers, but for people in rural America, and even more so, in the outback, or Serengeti, or Denali, or any other place remote from charging stations: long life devices will dominate, others burned for fuel.

  3. It’s not a “reported” acquisition. According to Israel’s business press, employees earlier this week were called into a meeting and told they all now work for Apple.

  4. Clearly, Apple’s greatest strength is their originality. They genuinely innovate, and the experienced gained, is what sustains, nay, propels them forward.

    Apple has the vision to anticipate their needs long before their competitors have developed any demand for their knockoffs, much less anticipating their needs from channel partners.

    Imagine the sheer waste of resources trying to keep pace with a behemoth like Apple? Apple’s greatest competitors probably spend three-dollars for every dollar Apple spends, just to cover the costs of their mistakes and to overcompensate with outrageous marketing budgets and strategies that would have us believe their product is just as good.

    By the time they achieve market success, they discover they poorly anticipated their needs for raw materials, and by then it’s too late because they can’t even buy materials at competitive prices.

    It’s in Apple’s DNA to eschew dead-end technologies and disk-based hard drives was next in a long procession of antiquated technology on Apple’s radar that has no future in Apple’s vision.

    How many companies out there are truly original? And how many are pretenders, filling up the world with garbage?

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