Verizon Wireless prices Samsung Galaxy Tab at $600

Apple Online Store“Verizon Wireless defended its $600 price tag for the Samsung Galaxy Tab, which goes on sale Nov. 11, noting that no service contract is required and that the device comes with embedded 3G cellular service along with Wi-Fi,” Matt Hamblen reports for Computerworld.

“Verizon customers will pay only monthly for data usage on the Galaxy Tab, starting at $20 per month for 1GB, Verizon spokeswoman Brenda Raney said Wednesday,” Hamblen reports. “The pricing is the same as for buying the Wi-Fi iPad bundled with the MiFi mobile hot spot from Verizon starting on Oct. 28: $20 for 1GB, $35 for 3GB, $50 for 5GB and $80 for 10GB. (The $80 plan was not originally included in the iPad bundle announcement but applies to both the iPad and the Galaxy Tab.)”

“Typically, Verizon and other carriers require a two-year service contract for a smartphone purchase, so Verizon’s approach represents an important shift in data pricing among carriers. But it is similar to an approach that AT&T started in the spring for monthly iPad 3G service priced at $14.99 for 250MB and $25 for 2GB,” Hamblen reports. “Some commenters on Computerworld.com complained that the $600 price tag for the Galaxy Tab was unreasonable compared to the iPad’s, which starts at $499 for the 16GB version.”

Hamblen reports, “One of the biggest differences is the touch-screen size, with the iPad’s at 9.7 in. and the Galaxy’s at 7 in.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: One naturally thinks that a 7-inch screen would offer 70% of the benefits of a 10-inch screen. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth. The screen measurements are diagonal, so that a 7-inch screen is only 45% as large as iPad’s 10-inch screen. You heard me right: Just 45% as large.

If you take an iPad an hold it upright in portrait view and draw an imaginary horizontal line halfway down the screen, the screens on these 7-inch tablets are a bit smaller than the bottom half of the ipad’s display. This size isn’t sufficient to create great tablet apps in our opinion. While one could increase the resolution of the display to make up for some of the difference, it is meaningless unless your tablet also includes sandpaper, so that the user can sand down their fingers to around one quarter of their present size.

Apple has done extensive user testing on tough interfaces over many years and we really understand this stuff. There are clear limits of how close you can physically place elements on a touchscreen before users cannot reliably tap, flick, or pinch them. This is one of the key reasons we think the 10-inch screen size is the minimum size required to create great tablet apps.

Every tablet user is also a smartphone user. No tablet can compete with the mobility of a smartphone; its ease of fitting into your pocket or purse, its unobtrusiveness when used in a crowd. Given that all tablet users will already have a smartphone in their pocket, giving up precious display area to fit a tablet in their pockets is clearly the wrong tradeoff.

The 7-inch tablets are tweeners. Too big to compete with a smartphone and too small to compete with an iPad.

Almost all of these new tablets use Android software, but even Google is telling the tablet manufacturers no tot use their current release, Froyo, for tablets and to wait for a special tablet release next year. What does it mean when your software supplier says not to use their software and what does it mean when you ignore them and use it anyway?

iPad now has over 35,000 apps on the App Store. This new crop of tablets will have near zero.

Our potential competitors are having a tough time coming close to iPad’s pricing, even with their far smaller, far less expensive screens. The iPad incorporates everything we’ve learned about building high value products from iPhone, iPods, and Macs. We create our own A4 chip, our own software, our own battery chemistry, our own enclosure, our own everything. And this results in an incredible product at a great price. The proof of this will be in the pricing of our competitors’ products which will likely offer less for more.

These are among the reasons we think the current crop of 7-inch tablets are going to be DOA. Dead On Arrival. Their manufacturers will learn the painful lesson that their tablets are too small and increase the size next year, thereby abandoning both customers and developers who jumped on the 7-inch bandwagon with an orphaned product.

Sounds like lots of fun ahead.Apple CEO Steve Jobs, October 18, 2010

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “KingMel” for the heads up.]

54 Comments

  1. “Samsung Galaxy Tab at $600” is the definition of “DOA.” It’s actually dead BEFORE arrival. And some of the other rumored vapor tablets are apparently dead even before production.

  2. “Samsung Galaxy Tab at $600” is the definition of “DOA.” It’s actually dead BEFORE arrival. And some of the other rumored vapor tablets are apparently dead even before production.

  3. BILL!!!

    I like the way you think my friend. I’d say 3 kins. And that’s being damned generous.

    Priced higher, but smaller sized?? Less apps? Froyo not for tablets??
    Must be something in the water in Korea.

    Aitsura nani kangaeteruno?

  4. BILL!!!

    I like the way you think my friend. I’d say 3 kins. And that’s being damned generous.

    Priced higher, but smaller sized?? Less apps? Froyo not for tablets??
    Must be something in the water in Korea.

    Aitsura nani kangaeteruno?

  5. Even Google doesn’t think this is a good idea for a tablet. HELLO?

    Why would anyone but this and not the iPad? I own 2 now. I have ZERO interest in 7-inch midget tablets. If I wanted smaller I would use my iPhones. I have 5 of those already. Who is the end customer and why would they not get the best in class iPad?

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