Astronaut reaches space station; daughter asks for iPhone

Parallels Desktop 5 for Mac “An upgraded Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying two cosmonauts and a veteran shuttle commander docked with the International Space Station Saturday evening after a two-day orbital chase, boosting the lab’s crew back to six,” William Harwood reports for CNET. “Astronaut Scott Kelly’s teenage daughter, Samantha, celebrating her birthday in Moscow, promptly asked her dad for an iPhone, ‘so I can keep up with your trip.'”

“‘I’m sorry, I didn’t hear that,’ Kelly replied from orbit during a call from the Russian mission control center,” Harwood reports. “‘Pleeeaaassseee?’ his daughter pleaded.”

Harwood reports, “Kelly did not reply as U.S. and Russian space officials laughed.”

Much more in the full article here.

36 Comments

  1. @Big Al
    “She may be a teenaged girl but she manipulates men like a woman twice her age.”

    LOL, so true, Fathers are just training dummies for them to perfect their skills until they hit the big leagues.

  2. @Big Al
    “She may be a teenaged girl but she manipulates men like a woman twice her age.”

    LOL, so true, Fathers are just training dummies for them to perfect their skills until they hit the big leagues.

  3. Somehow I think Samantha might be getting a surprise birthday present from Cupertino.

    Would be cool to see spacemen use the iPad for the onboard day-to-day utility. It does highlight the need for a stylus though if the iPad were to be carried outside to be used by men in space suits.

  4. Somehow I think Samantha might be getting a surprise birthday present from Cupertino.

    Would be cool to see spacemen use the iPad for the onboard day-to-day utility. It does highlight the need for a stylus though if the iPad were to be carried outside to be used by men in space suits.

  5. @chew

    There have been several iPods and some nintendo ds/gameboys in space with no problems so far.

    For mission critical “people will die if it fails” systems, that whole space hardened thing is important. For games/toys/entertainment/non-critical comunication – not so much.

  6. @chew

    There have been several iPods and some nintendo ds/gameboys in space with no problems so far.

    For mission critical “people will die if it fails” systems, that whole space hardened thing is important. For games/toys/entertainment/non-critical comunication – not so much.

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