W3C: Don’t deploy HTML5 in websites just yet

“HTML5, which updates the HTML specification to accommodate modern Web applications, has gained a lot of adherents in vendors like Microsoft, Google, and Apple,” Paul Krill reports for InfoWorld.

MacDailyNews Take: Paul, in case you missed it, there’s a new world order. Learn it. Know it. Live it: “Apple, Google, Microsoft.” It’s even alphabetical.

Krill continues, “But the specification is plain [sic] not ready yet for deployment to websites, an official with the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which oversees HTML5, stressed this week. ‘The problem we’re facing right now is there is already a lot of excitement for HTML5, but it’s a little too early to deploy it because we’re running into interoperability issues,’ including differences between video on devices, said the official, Philippe Le Hegaret, W3C interaction domain leader. He is responsible for specifications like HTML and SVG.”

“Le Hegaret acknowledged HTML5 is viewed as a ‘game changer.’ Companies now can deploy HTML5 in their applications or in intranets where a rendering engine can be controlled, said Le Hegaret,” Krill reports. “But it is a different story on the ‘open Web'” where interoperability is an issue, he added. ‘What’s happening is the industry is realizing that HTML5 is going to be real,’ said Le Hegaret.”

Krill reports, “Apple has positioned HTML5 as a replacement for Adobe’s Flash rich Internet technology. But Flash and similar technologies, such as Microsoft Silverlight, still have a place, Le Hegaret said.”

MacDailyNews Take: What’s that, grinding processors to a halt, providing malware vectors, draining batteries, being proprietary and closed, or something else equally wonderful?

Krill continues, “It will take years before all Web clients support HTML5, he said. He cited Microsoft’s IE6 browser as an example of popular client not supporting the standard. ‘IE6 is still being used on the Web today, and it is 10 years old.’ Over time, however, HTML5 will become the standard for websites, he said. ‘You will see less and less websites using Flash,’ said Le Hegaret.”

“Meanwhile, HTML5 is headed toward final approval in two to three years,” Krill reports. “HTML5 development was begun in 2004 by the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group.”

MacDailyNews Take: Fast-tracked. Molasses-like legal proceedings involving blatant patent infringement move faster.

Krill continues, “Digital rights management also is not supported in HTML5, Le Hegarete said. This means some video producers will not deploy their videos in HTML5 without this type of protection, he said. HTML5 is an open standard, presenting a problem for DRM. ‘If we are going to develop a solution for DRM which is open, it would be broken by a hacker within two days,’ he said. ‘There is no point of us doing that.’ There is a possibility for DRM in HTML5 at some point, however, but it is not in the plan at the moment, said Le Hegaret.”

MacDailyNews Take: Yet another reason why Steve Jobs wants videos to use HTML5, not Flash. No DRM means convenience for customers, which means more content sales, which leads directly to more device sales; where the healthy margins are, at least for Apple.

Full article here.

64 Comments

  1. IE6 is holding up deployment of HTML5? The folks that ares using it, and can’t upgrade to newer version because of hardware limitations shouldn’t be the issue. They can get off the web, get new machines, or upgrade their browsers.

    Really, the machines (or users, in some cases) are probably already dead, for all practical purposes. And, newsflash W3C: that’s one of the hallmarks of what we so generically refer to as “technology”. It changes. Fast. Those that don’t change with it are left in the dust.

    Kinda like Adobe Flash.

  2. IE6 is holding up deployment of HTML5? The folks that ares using it, and can’t upgrade to newer version because of hardware limitations shouldn’t be the issue. They can get off the web, get new machines, or upgrade their browsers.

    Really, the machines (or users, in some cases) are probably already dead, for all practical purposes. And, newsflash W3C: that’s one of the hallmarks of what we so generically refer to as “technology”. It changes. Fast. Those that don’t change with it are left in the dust.

    Kinda like Adobe Flash.

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