PlayedForSure: Google shafts Android partners with rebadged HTC ‘Nexus One’

Christmas PD5FM $10 discountAndrew Orlowski reports for The Register, “‘It’s Google’s autistic approach to relationships,’ one senior phone exec told me this week. ‘They don’t know what hurt they’re doing, and they don’t care.'”

“It’s nothing personal, guys… But even if the decision to shaft its closest Android partners and biggest customers is an aberration, a one-off, a fling that Google will later regret – then the size of the parties involved means it’s going to have lasting repercussions,” Orlowski reports.

“There are over a dozen Google phones. Only one is a real Google phone. Only one is a Google superphone. And you can only get that from Google. Won’t Sony Ericsson, Motorola, Acer and Samsung be feeling pleased today? Sony Ericsson’s X10 has a fairly identical spec (plus Sony branding) or better – but it’s not a ‘superphone.’ And not the ‘real thing,'” Orlowski reports.

MacDailyNews Take: “Superphone.” We’re still laughing at that one.

Orlowski continues, “If you thought there was a level playing field, you’ve been mugged. If you’re looking for a differentiator, similarly, you’ve been mugged.”

In addition, “Google stoked the bogus ‘net neutrality’ scare (directly writing legislation for the European Parliament, in one instance) which handicapped the network operators’ ability to monetize their network fairly (by say launching a VoD service) ensuring that Google’s own private network (exempt from neutrality rules) becomes more valuable. Neutrality was the Global Warming scare of network world. ManBearPig may not exist, but it’s amazing what you can get legislated if enough people think it does.”

MacDailyNews Take: As we’ve already stated regarding this issue (among others): “We usually prefer the government to be hands-off wherever possible, Laissez-faire, except in cases where the free market obviously cannot adequately self-regulate (antitrust, for just one example). Regulations are static and the marketplace is fluid, so extensive regulations can have unintended, unforeseen results down the road. We sincerely hope that there are enough forces in place and/or that the balances adjust in such a manner as to keep the Net neutral.”

Orlowski continues, “Remind me, what’s open about Google now? Another casualty for the same reasons, is surely the Open Handset Alliance itself. It’s odd to read how: Each member of the Open Handset Alliance is strongly committed to greater openness in the mobile ecosystem. Increased openness will enable everyone in our industry to innovate more rapidly and respond better to consumers’ demands. ‘Innovating in the open’ now means ‘getting ready to shaft you behind closed doors.'”

“As for the winners, Apple suddenly doesn’t look so bad. Operators hate being told what kind of subsidy they may offer, and chafe at the control freakery. But at least the iPhone is a surefire hit, it drags in the punters. None of Google’s models – either demiphones or Superphones – have shown they can,” Orlowski writes. “And Apple’s terms are much less onerous than a year ago.”

Full article – very highly recommended – here.

40 Comments

  1. What amazed me most about “Net Neutrality” was how many people seemingly just read the name, then assumed All Is Good.

    My brother had a Rottweiler named “Buddy”. Didn’t mean “Buddy” wasn’t put down after attacking his then 5 year old nephew!

  2. MacDailyNews says: “Regulations are static and the marketplace is fluid, so extensive regulations can have unintended, unforeseen results down the road. We sincerely hope that there are enough forces in place and/or that the balances adjust in such a manner as to keep the Net neutral.”

    Laissez-faire capitalism has never really been tried, for obvious reasons. Even the most libertarian economist on the planet agrees that the rule of law (that is, regulation) is always necessary to keep the bullies from stealing your lunch money.

    I might add that the Constitution, like most regulation, is basically static and that’s a good thing. The marketplace PREFERS to have stable regulation so that it can plan long-term instead of constantly reacting to the shifting playing field. Note, too, that a wisely written regulation (not unlike a good Constitution) is sufficiently broad and fair, with no special loopholes carved in it, that the playing field remains as lever as possible for everyone. There is not a corporation on this planet, however, who doesn’t have paid lobbyists clamoring for changes to regulation that, in effect, guarantee special privileges to enhance profits. Google just happens to be the easiest one to spot right now because they’re one of the few companies today willing to flash all their cash.

  3. Mike,

    You obviously missed this part of MDN’s Take:

    “We usually prefer the government to be hands-off wherever possible, Laissez-faire, except in cases where the free market obviously cannot adequately self-regulate (antitrust, for just one example). “

    So, are you disingenuous or just retarded?

  4. 1. When can I vote for MDN’s Take writer for U.S. President?

    2. By the end of 2009, Gallup reports that 40 percent of Americans self-identified as conservative, up from 37 percent in 2008. Moderates clocked in at 36 percent, down from 37 a year earlier. And 21 percent of Americans self-identified as liberal, down a point from 2008.

  5. Historian,

    I asked my doctor if Obama’s purple lips could be an indication of an oxygen supply issue.

    My doctor replied, “Well, it is rather hard to breathe when your head is up your ass most of the time.”

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