Why it’s time to join the smartphone cult

“Owning a smartphone is like your first taste of sushi – it takes a while to try, but afterwards, you wonder how you lived without it,” Debbie Mayo-Smith writes for The New Zealand Herald. “Is it a coincidence that, while I sat at a café writing this article, four out of five people had an iPhone, and the fifth a Blackberry?”

Mayo-Smith writes, “For personal productivity and business prowess, they’re a 2010 necessity.”

MacDailyNews Take: That fifth BlackBerry is not a 2010 necessity, it’s a 2010 anachronism.

Mayo-Smith with her reasons why smartphone are necessities for personal productivity and business prowess:
• Make more sales
• Get information as fast as you need it
• Get more done
• Education on the run
• Faster, cheaper, focused business communication
• Social media on the run

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “James W.” for the heads up.]

21 Comments

  1. “Owning a smartphone is like your first taste of sushi – it takes a while to try, but afterwards, you wonder how you lived without it,” Debbie Mayo-Smith writes

    Women think different(ly) than.. well.. the rest.

  2. Technology is wonderful…..but

    Sometimes I wonder that since email now robs me of about 1.5 hours a day out of my life, trying to manage all of the social stuff,…how many minutes a day does a smartphone suck from our lives. Or social networking?

    And to think I was shocked to learn that the average kid watches 20+ hours a week of TV. What is happening to our lives?

  3. I’m totally with this, in principle – But without a portable, full-sized (or near-full-sized) keyboard, it ain’t gonna happen. With an iPhone/iPod Touch the real need to carry around even a laptop is minimal, if the iPhone has a keyboard. Someone please make it so.

  4. @Mr. Peabody

    I’m surprised there is no keyboard accessory that plugs into the iPhone. I personally love the touch keyboard, but I would think there would be enough motivation by accessory makers and demand by customers for a simple, portable keyboard that plugs into the iPhone.

  5. Point by point:
    • Make more sales
    I don’t use a smart phone for business, so i’ll just have to guess that this would certainly help.

    • Get information as fast as you need it
    How fast is “as fast as I need it”?

    • Get more done
    Mmmm, 50/50 on this one. Why do I need to “get more done” What is “more”? More playing guitar on the porch with friends? How does that quantify literally and to the quality of my life?

    • Education on the run
    I don’t want an “education on the run”.
    It’s hard enough for me to study while sitting still in my room!

    • Faster, cheaper, focused business communication
    Faster, sure.
    Cheaper? Pay for the device, pay for the updates and upgrades, pay for the service provider, etc.. Hmmmm….

    • Social media on the run
    I certainly don’t need Social media “on the run”. I am with people, meeting people, talking to people all the time while I’m out and “on the run”. A device would provide a barrier between me and all these real, social interactions.

    So out of this list of 6 reasons, I will give 2.5 points for accuracy.

  6. “Owning a smartphone is like your first taste of sushi – it takes a while to try, but afterwards, you wonder how you lived without it.”

    Not so much. I have fish allergies.

  7. What is the definition of “Smart Phone”? as they call smart phone with every phone that plays music, almost every phone fit in that category.
    I believe they need to re define the term. They claim that NOKIA has the biggest market share of smart phones but no one has ever seeing a smart phone from nokia. As Sprint’s CEO once said “The iphone is in another category”.
    There should be: multimedia phones, email/internet phones, and the iPhones (the real SMART phones).

  8. NHL:

    You are from the 20th century, so you aren’t quite familiar with the advantages of the 21st.

    Your points of contention:

    • Get information as fast as you need it
    How fast is “as fast as I need it”? When you’re in your car (or in the street), on your way to a meeting with a supplier, and receive a call from a potential client, who wants to know if you could give me an approximate quote for some shipment, and your only device where you can look up pricing, configurations and shipping estimates is your iPhone (or other non-CDMA smartphone). You’ll go online, get the data in about 15-20 seconds and give the guy a quote. Later in the day, you’ll close the deal. Without your iPhone, he’d likely call the next guy (your competitor); if he was at his desk, or had an iPhone, he’d be getting that sale.

    • Get more done
    Mmmm, 50/50 on this one. Why do I need to “get more done” What is “more”? More playing guitar on the porch with friends? How does that quantify literally and to the quality of my life?

    Obviously, she meant more work done; not more fun done (although that can also be accomplished with some multi-player interactive games that are extremely entertaining). More work, as in, while you’re waiting in line at the post office, or bank, or Starbucks, you can check if your shipment has been delivered; if so, you can send that invoice and put the amount into account receivables. If it takes 3 minutes to complete, you did actual work while waiting for something else, which means three minutes of work less for when you’re back in your office.

    • Education on the run
    I don’t want an “education on the run”.
    It’s hard enough for me to study while sitting still in my room!

    This doesn’t mean lecturing; education is any kind of learning, which can even include reading trade magazines.

    • Faster, cheaper, focused business communication
    Faster, sure.
    Cheaper? Pay for the device, pay for the updates and upgrades, pay for the service provider, etc.. Hmmmm….

    Still much cheaper than paying for the equivalent amount of postage (if you were to send the same number of ordinary, first-class letters as you send e-mails). If you send more than six e-mails per day, you have already paid off your data plan by postage saved (not to mention paper, envelopes, pencils/pens, or toner if you actually use computer to print those letters).

    • Social media on the run
    I certainly don’t need Social media “on the run”. I am with people, meeting people, talking to people all the time while I’m out and “on the run”. A device would provide a barrier between me and all these real, social interactions.

    Not quite true. The emerging social media has allowed me to re-connect with people whom I had long forgotten. It has in no way put up barrier with my existing, direct person-to-person connections. In fact the availability of Skype, SMS and similar has made those interactions more frequent than before. One just needs to learn how to take advantage of the device. Treating it as an obstacle will most certainly turn it onto an obstacle.

  9. A final note on the up and coming iPhone keyboard: Why Blu-Tooth? Why would the ideal be any wireless keyboard… Makes no sense. On an iPhone you’ve got three transceivers: 1) Cellular; 2) Wi-Fi; 3) Blu-Tooth, and on a third generation iPod Touch you’ve got two of the three. In order to use the external keyboard you’ve got to have the iPhone close by, and preferably standing up or lying in landscape mode, preferably on the keyboard so that you can actually type. Since the iPhone and keyboard need to be in very close proximity to one another why bother wasting battery life running more wireless services? And, this obvious accessory must be compatible with all generations of iPod Touches and iPhones.

    Thank you and good night.

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