Linn sounds death knell of the CD player?

Apple Online Store“A manufacturer of hi-fi systems has sounded what it said could be the death knell of the compact disc player,” Douglas Fraser reports for BBC News.

“Linn Products has become the first manufacturer to announce it will give up on CDs from the start of next year,” Fraser reports. “Instead, the niche company, based in East Renfrewshire, will focus on producing digital streaming equipment.”

Fraser reports, “The firm, which makes systems costing from £2,500 to more than £100,000, said discerning customers recognised the superior quality of digital streaming.”

“The shift from CD players to digital music streamers has been very recent. It was only during 2009 that the digital players outsold Linn’s CD players,” Fraser reports. “The newer technology allows digital streaming through other operating systems, including home computers and networking throughout homes.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: A future headline: “More blood on Apple iTunes Store’s play button: The CD player is dead”

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “James W.” for the heads up.]

35 Comments

  1. But Bill Gates predicted that DVD and CD will be the future for Movies and Music distribution….. LOL, It’s really funny to see that everything Bill Gates predicts always results exactly the positive.

    Apple stop using “floppy drives” years before PC’s because they knew that will be obsolete very soon. They stop using the CD/DVD drive in the MacBook Air because again, no much people use the CD or DVD (in a Mac, you don’t need to reinstall the all OS and programs every 3 or 6 months).
    They never adopt the Bluray because is will become obsolete before it get popular.

  2. “A future headline: “More blood on Apple iTunes Store’s play button: The CD player is dead””

    And “iTunes Store’s play button” ← “Steve Jobs’ foresight”

  3. Haven’t used, or bought, a single CD since the day I got my first iPhone over 2 years ago. I did buy over 800 iTunes tracks though. I looked at it like I’ve bought a lot of songs numerous times; Record, 8 track, cassette, CD – now I’ll never, ever have to buy them again. Justified it for me.

    Wow. I’m older than 8 track. My kids laugh when I tell them about it. What? You push a button to skip to the middle of the next song?

  4. It’s stupid to think the CD will die. CDs were supposed to kill the LP format. And what happened? LPs aren’t dead, and CDs will keep on living like them.

  5. Until most online music stores start selling music in LOSSLESS format (or better… 96/24 anyone?), I will happily continue to buy my CDs, thank you.

    And even *that* is assuming everyone in the world has and will continue to have internet access (not so much). Ergo, at least at this point, it would be a big mistake for any company to completely abandon physical media. It’s not going away until its functionality can be completely and reliably replaced.

  6. Gil@ Sarasota. My ’70s vintage LP12 still runs today. Sounds awesome.

    My NAD 533 plays well, but it dies need a new stylus.

    Yours SmuglyIt’s stupid to think the CD will die. CDs were supposed to kill the LP format. And what happened? LPs aren’t dead, and CDs will keep on living like them.

    Probably not as SACDs and DVDs have better sound in the same physical format.

  7. I still buy CDs. I can buy a CD from Amazon for little more than an album from iTunes, save the CD for archiving, and rip to the format du jour.

    The only tracks I’ve purchased from iTunes are the occasional single or a special recording unavailable elsewhere.

    The only way I’ll quit buying CDs is if either A) They become unavailable, or B) The studios/producers start selling a superior product for download (as opposed to the inferior product available now).

    With no physical format in the picture, we could start getting studio-quality 96khz/24-bit audio files for playback on audiophile equipment. Of course, since most people have crap equipment to listen to music on, there’s no demand for anything but the crap audio files we get now.

  8. @NeoVoyager
    “Until most online music stores start selling music in LOSSLESS format (or better… 96/24 anyone?), I will happily continue to buy my CDs, thank you.”

    Couldn’t agree more, having worked with audio files from 44.1/24 all the way up to 96/24, I think the average consumer has no idea what they’re missing.

  9. @ i love bluray

    I understand that people consume media in different ways but personally I’ve never purchased a single DVD in my life. Unlike music, I never have the desire to watch a movie more than once. When you already know whats going to happen whats the point? I will occasionally re-watch a favorite movie that shows up on HBO but I’d never pay for it again. When I rent a movie through iTunes or Blockbuster, I have no need to re-sell that movie as I didn’t pay $20 (or whatever they sell for) to get the movie in the first place.

    Rent – – view – – delete.

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