Time for Apple to get rid of the iPhone NDA?

“Apple’s iPhone app platform is brand new, so developers have plenty of questions they want to ask each other, or tips to share. But they can’t — at least not without violating Apple’s non-disclosure agreement,” Dan Frommer reports for SIlicon Alley Insider.

“We understand why Apple would want to have an NDA on its software kit while it was in beta, perhaps so people didn’t get the wrong impression if bugs or half-baked apps leaked out. And maybe it even makes sense to have an NDA the first few weeks that the iPhone App Store is up and running, just to keep the lid on things if something blew up, say, a security hole,” Frommer reports.

“But now the NDA has outlived any purpose it once had, and is threatening to hurt, not help,” Frommer reports. “If the iPhone platform is going to be a long-term success, it’s going to involve not just software companies with a lot of resources, but thousands of garage coders whipping up inventive stuff. And Apple needs to keep them happy, not tick them off. We are two weeks into iPhone’s launch: High time to let developers ask questions, form communities, lease themselves as consultants, write books, share advice, etc. — and time to get rid of the iPhone NDA.”

Full article here.

Good thing the weekend’s almost here, Dan. From the overwrought tone of your article, it sounds like you need a break. That Frommer goes from “maybe it even makes sense to have an NDA the first few weeks” to “we are two weeks into iPhone’s launch: High time to get rid of the iPhone NDA!” in the space of three sentences is enough to make us scream TGIF!

21 Comments

  1. “And maybe it even makes sense to have an NDA the first few weeks that the iPhone App Store is up and running, just to keep the lid on things if something blew up, say, a security hole.”

    “We are two weeks into iPhone [App Store]’s launch.”

    Lol.

  2. Dan I wouldn’t worry too much about Apple’s NDA. Go ahead and post. They’ve never been to worried about people violating their software development rules & regulations.

  3. @HMCIV “They’ve never been to worried about people violating their software development rules & regulations.”

    Yeah, I agree. I mean, it’s not like they have a legal department or anything…

    Sarcasm, ya gotta love it.

  4. I once wrote in the day’s of yore that Apple inc. are busy developing stuff that we didn’t know we wanted or needed until they released it, we have now gotten so used to that fact that when we do get stuff that we didn’t know we wanted or needed, we start complaining that it doesn’t do this, that or the other. Take what’sis name yesterday with his comment about mobile me.

    I didn’t know that I wanted to sync. my iphone with my mac instantly until mobile me arrived, I didn’t know that I wanted to do the same with a PC & vice versa, but now that I can or we can, twits like him suggets that waiting five minutes for an upload from a PC or mac to an iphone is a shoddy job that needs improving yesterday. That particular issue lies in the licenced mobile telephony operators.
    Just like us, they did not know what people wanted until Apple inc made it possible for us to realise what we have been missing so they haven’t upgraded their service to meet these new needs.
    The trouble is that as soon as they decide they are loosing money failing us, they go to where the puck has been not where it will be.

    We all need to be responsible for our own actions so that we can put our expectations into a proper perspective.

    The Crabapple has spoken, thus says the Crabapple.

  5. Of course there could be some “SONDAF = Securized Official NDA Forum”… Quite much securized though!… ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />

  6. The problem as I see it is not so much that the new features aren’t working perfectly from the start, but rather that some of the old features that people had been depending upon for years (webmail, for example) went down for a large number of users.

    Losing mail for 3 days was not on my calender, and ended up costing me time and money. If it were MS or Dell I would be used to it by now, but it was Apple so I expected more from them.

  7. The way I see it, TALENTED programmers aren’t being held back, they are learning their way around the system as they go… much like the hacker community creates all their on libraries as they go along.

    Somewhere between the hackers and the gifted non-hackers lie the whiners who want someone to hold their hand while they moan about how they can only get 10 fps while the next guy is getting 30 fps. They don’t want to do the work, just reap the rewards.

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