BBC: iPlayer for Macs to launch by end of 2008

“The BBC will launch a download version of its iPlayer online video service for Apple Mac users by the end of 2008,” BBC News reports.

“The corporation’s director general Mark Thompson made the commitment in a blog posting on the BBC’s website. ‘I hope this good news is evidence of the hard work that the BBC is committing to supporting other platforms,’ he wrote,” The Beeb reports.

“The BBC had faced criticism for launching the download iPlayer service for Windows users only,” The Beeb reports.

“The BBC’s iPlayer [currently] comes in two versions – a program which allows users to download programmes to their Windows PC and a streaming version on the web available to all users,” The Beeb reports.

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Dirty Pierre le Punk” for the heads up.]

Market share is but one measure that developers should consider. Average income, disposable income, level of education, willingness to pay for software and services, etc. — all of these important measures tilt strongly in Mac users’ favor. As we often ask developers, do you want a bunch of people for whom low prices (or free) is the top priority (and among whom piracy is rampant), or do you want an educated, informed group of people who have proven that they are willing and able to pay for your software?

Mac-only and cross-platform developers are smart. Windows-only developers are not.

Someday we’ll all laugh about how the vast majority of the world had at one time ended up on the worst possible platform.

“Ignorance is bliss” ought to be Microsoft’s company motto.

28 Comments

  1. The BBC will launch a download version of its iPlayer online video service for Apple Mac users by the end of 2008

    Jesus, a whole year to wait.

    The suspense is killing me…really it is. NOT.

    Why so long? Call Apple for christsakes, they will whip it out in a few months.

    Making their own DRM? Spotted Dick DRM?

  2. @RealityCheck,

    This has nothing to do with marketshare, but rather the validity of an operating systems. BBC chose to focus their development efforts solely based on marketshare, nothing else. There’s plenty of cross-platform ventures out there. Nothing was stopping them from working on both Windows and Mac versions at the same time, definitely not funding.

  3. ‘I hope this good news is evidence of the hard work that the BBC is committing to supporting other platforms,’ he wrote,” The Beeb reports.

    It’s evidence you’re a bunch of lazy asses who are very reluctant to tread outside of your safe, cozy, and woefully incomplete skill set.

  4. As a Brit and an ex-admirer of the BBC I’ve been shocked at this recent scandal. One of several which have shown that the BBC is throwing its admired values overboard.

    Please, dear fellow posters, don’t make the mistake of apologizing for the BBC.

    The guy who’s managing the iPlayer development and rollout is in fact an ex-Microsoft executive, Erik Huggers.

    It’s that bad. The BBC got into bed with Microsoft and are only getting out from under the soiled sheets because of the public reaction.

    There have been protests in front of Broadcasting House in London. The demonstrators carried placards which read thus:

    British
    Broadcasting
    Corrupted

  5. @Reality Check

    You are correct, however the Australian ABC’s Now player still allows access to ABC made shows (such as Enough Rope) that were missed on ABC TV.

    So basically the ABC’s player also allows it’s audience (worldwide, not just local) access to ABC made shows that we missed also.

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