Apple patent describes future iPods, iPhones interacting wirelessly

“A future generation of iPod and iPhone portable media devices from Apple Inc. may use wireless technology to receive automated software updates and interact with other iPods and iPhones located within the same general vicinity, a recent patent request has revealed,” Katie Marsal reports for AppleInsider.

“The September 1, 2006 filing with the United States Patent and Trademark Office describes methods ‘for delivery of data to a portable electronic device from another electronic device’ over a local wireless network,” Marsal reports.

MacDailyNews Note: Microsoft’s anemic-selling, repackaged Toshiba Gigabeat – badged “Zune” – with limited, DRM-laden wireless “squirting” was inflicted on November 14, 2006.

Marsal continues, “Some examples of specific media data that could be shared between the players include songs, albums, audiobooks, playlists, movies, music videos, photos, computer games, podcasts, audio and/or video presentations, news reports, and sports updates.”

“Other sharable data, the Apple added, may include resource data such as maps, profile information associated with a user, and subscription content. The nature in which media items are shared can also be unrestricted or restricted. According to the filing, examples of restricted sharing of media items include a media item that has limited-use rights or which contains only a sample of the full content,” Marsal reports. “Data, such as audio tracks and video, could also be shared after being purchased wirelessly from a remote server.”

“The filing, which also covers ‘Remote Media Update’ and ‘Multiple Access Point Discrimination’ techniques, is credited to high-ranking Apple employees Stanley Ng, Andrew Hodge, Anthony Fadell, Jeffrey Robbin, Robert Borchers, Chris Bell, and Eddy Cue,” Marsal reports.

More in the full article, including patent app illustrations, here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Winston” for the heads up.]

20 Comments

  1. Please! What a dumb idea that “squirting” is (was??). As though passing by someone else who has a Zune (which is as rare as sightings of the Abominable Snowman anyway) creates enough of an instant bond that you want to share all that’s on your Zune with them. I personally don’t care to have my device (the electronic one) loaded down with whatever crap you have on yours (electronic device), no matter how sweet your smile and sexy your walk.

  2. “The September 1, 2006 filing with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.”

    “Microsoft’s anemic-selling, repackaged Toshiba Gigabeat – badged ‘Zune’ – with limited, DRM-laden wireless “squirting” was inflicted on November 14, 2006.”

    Take note, people. When this hits and fanboys all over say Apple ripped off the Zune, you can cite this as proof of otherwise.

  3. ‘As though passing by someone else who has a Zune (which is as rare as sightings of the Abominable Snowman anyway)”

    The difference is there is mounting scientific evidence that the Abominable Snowman exsts. I have had no proof that a Zune exists ‘in the wild’.

  4. What if companies actually tested their products?
    What if the CEO of Jif extra crunchy peanut butter actually
    tested and put a normal spoon in the jar to get some peanut butter out near the bottom. There is no way possible to get any out without getting it all over your knuckles. The experience simply was never tested.

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