Apple Store“Steve Jobs stepped into the light with another long essay [yesterday] (I still think he should start a blog) on Apple’s environmental policies. Remember if you will that little kerfuffle a few weeks back about how the environmental organization was using its considerable PR chops to smack Apple around a little for the nasty chemicals that go inside its computers, all the while making nice with Dell. I didn’t think much of its claims and for the most part, still don’t,” Arik Hesseldahl writes for BusinessWeek.

“Jobs finally shot back today in a signed six-page statement entitled ‘A Greener Apple,’ saying that after investigating the matter, it’s his opinion that Apple is either ahead of many of the companies that Greenpeace has graded higher, or soon will be ahead of them,” Hesseldahl writes.

Full article here.

Stephen Withers writes for iTWire, “Greenpeace’s response to Apple’s announcement fails to give full credit to the Mac and iPod maker, and to some extent appears to misrepresent CEO Steve Jobs’ open letter in order to justify the environmental group’s April 2007 report (as well as earlier editions) on mobile phone and PC manufacturers’ greenness.”

Withers writes, “The problem with the Greenpeace report was that it made no attempt to find out about the actual presence of hazardous substances in different companies’ products. Instead, it merely ranked companies ‘on information that is publicly available.'”

“When Greenpeace welcomed Jobs’ statement that ‘Today we’re changing our policy,’ it failed to make it clear that what he actually announced was a change in policy regarding talking about Apple’s efforts in reducing and eliminating hazardous substances and increasing recycling, not a change in its policy about those substances or practices,” Withers writes.

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Readers “LinuxGuy and Mac Prodigal Son” and “Judge Bork” for the heads up.]