Samsung’s US Telecom chief looks forward to Apple’s ‘iPhone’ debut

“The U.S. wireless industry should grow 7% to 10% next year, according to the head of Samsung Electronics’s North American wireless unit,” Roger Cheng reports for Dow Jones Newswires.

Cheng reports, “That compares with 7% to 8% growth for this year, said Dale Sohn, president of Samsung Telecommunications America. It’s one of the reasons why Samsung is expanding its product lineup to 60 devices in 2007. ‘I don’t see growth slowing in the U.S. market,’ he told Dow Jones Newswires Thursday during the Samsung Mobile Summit in New York.”

“Sohn said Samsung has taken the No. 2 position in the U.S. market behind Motorola. The world’s largest handset maker, Nokia, was third,” Cheng reports. “Samsung hopes its strategy of selling a wide variety of products will pay off in winning over the diverse U.S. customer base. One of the key capabilities is music. Sohn said he looks forward to Apple Computer Inc.’s launch of its iPhones because it gives Samsung the chance to tout its own lineup of music phones.”

Full article here.
Sohn must also enjoy being driven over by steamrollers. Hey, whatever happened to Samsung’s “we will take top spot in music players from Apple by 2007” vow? They’re quickly running out of time. Samsung has quite a lot of ground to cover in 17 days.

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Samsung: we will take top spot in music players from Apple by 2007 – January 09, 2006

26 Comments

  1. result: italics”Sohn said he looks forward to Apple Computer Inc.’s launch of its iPhones because it gives Samsung the chance to tout its own lineup of music phones.”

    Yep, just like the US auto industry looked forward to the arrival of Japanese cars because it gave them a chance to tout its own lineup of cars…uh, huh.

    WHISTLE IN THE DARK – “To be cheerful or optimistic in a situation that doesn’t warrant cheer or optimism.”

  2. They’re actually smart in focusing on cell phones rather than DAPs. The current US cell phone market has a fairly high turnover rate in terms of the handsets. This, coupled with the incompatibility between most carriers, makes it a very attractive market for handset makers. I bet Samsung sold more music phones than Apple did iPods this year. As awesome as the iPods are, there is a large chunk of the population that could care less. They just want any old music player. And if their cell phone can do it, they would just get the phone and forgo the DAP. Apple would be wise to get into the market before the next fad in cell phone takes hold and makes an iTunes phone obsolete.

  3. Actually, what Samsung really do best is copy everyone else, tweak a bit, and manufacture cheaply.

    So no doubt they really are looking forward to seeing the Apple phone so they can get busy making something similar to add to their lineup of 4000 other phones.

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