Nearly half of computers purchased at Harvard this year were Apple Macs

“Apple Computer’s chief financial officer, Peter Oppenheimer, announced last week that the company’s higher education division just had its best ever back-to-school quarter, and Harvard is part of the trend,” Yifen Chen reports for The Harvard Crimson.

Chen reports, “According to Daniel D. Moriarty, the University’s chief information officer (CIO), personal purchases of Macintosh computers at Harvard are up 30 percent from last year, while sales of IBM Lenovo machines have more or less flat-lined.”

“Moriarty added that Harvard is one of Apple’s largest educational re-sellers. He said that several years ago, Apple sales were lagging, but now campus demand for Macs has almost caught up to demand for non-Mac PCs,” Chen reports.

Chen reports, “Moriarty and Faculty of Arts and Sciences CIO Larry Levine offered multiple explanations for this new trend. ‘Historically, Apple products have been perceived by a lot of consumers as being more expensive than a Wintel machine, and Apple has reduced prices recently,’ Moriarty said. ‘I think that’s helped on the financial side.'”

Chen reports, “Levine said that before, consumers shied away from Macs because of a fear that they would not be compatible with many common applications, but now that perception has faded. ‘The move Apple made to the Intel architecture, which allowed people to run Windows and Mac OS side by side, [allowed Macs] to effectively emulate Windows applications,’ Moriarty said.”

Chen reports, “Both CIOs also mentioned that since Mac OS is based on the Unix operating system, having that functionality is also appealing to people who have a more scientific or technical bent.”

Full article here.
On October 12th, we covered the story that 45-percent of computers purchased at Princeton this year were Apple Macs. We’re still waiting for the Yale results, but expect much the same stellar results.

Related articles:
Analyst: Apple Mac gains market share, the reason why is significant – October 26, 2006
IDC: Apple Mac attained 5.8% of U.S. market share in Q3 06 – October 18, 2006
Gartner: Apple Mac grabbed 6.1% of U.S. market share in Q3 06 – October 18, 2006
Apple Q4 earnings results: $546M net profit on $4.84B revenue, sold 1.61M Macs, 8.729M iPods – October 18, 2006
45-percent of computers purchased at Princeton this year were Apple Macs – October 12, 2006
Gartner: Apple Mac grabbed 4.6% U.S. market share in Q2 06 – July 19, 2006
IDC: Apple Mac attained 4.8% U.S. market share in Q2 06 – July 19, 2006

48 Comments

  1. Although I’m a Brit, I’ve always had a soft spot for Harvard, perhaps because I once knew a few ex-Harvard kids – but that was many years ago ….

    …. that was in the good old days when the majority of Americans still believed that our planet was older than 6,000 years.

    How times change!

  2. Hey, we start with the “smart schools” and work our way down. And at the bottom of the list are those schools that “HAD” Macs and exchanged them for PC’s.

    But Hey, someone has to flip burgers!! LOL ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

    N.

  3. Maybe the percentage of Macs used by students will replace the SATs, US News rankings and other traditional discriminators as a measure of collegiate excellence. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was a close correlation.

  4. I’m a member of the technology team here at Harvard, in the support department, and I know a 50% increase is a conservative estimate. We have an exclusive relationship with Lenovo for the pc-box maker side of things, but the buzz is all about the Macs. And, seriously, Lenovo’s new designs are nothing an IBM fanboy could get excited about- they are noticeably cheaper and less attractive than the IBM Thinkpads. Apple wins on design and utility. As the article mentions, the discounts available on the Lenovo product are deep and wide, and yet, their share is stagnant.

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