What kind of green are ‘environmental extortionists’ really after?

“When I began writing the Apple and the Media series, I expected to find lots of examples of companies, individuals, and journalists suing Apple or otherwise using the company’s name for a free ride,” Daniel Eran writes for RoughlyDrafted. “I didn’t expect to uncover a conspiracy of greed, blackmail, protection money, and other mob tactics hiding under the sheep’s clothing of environmentalism.”

“Are certain environmental groups adopting the Overture / Google Paid Search business model? First hand reports from Apple employees say the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition approached Steve Jobs asking for money shortly after staging its first MacWorld demonstration against Apple,” Eran writes.

Eran writes, “Job reportedly ended the discussion immediately. Does paying off the SVTC protect companies from the wrath of its publicity stunts? The SVTC talks about environmental goals, but doesn’t support their conspicuous rage against Apple with facts. What kind of green are they really after?”

“Of the thousands of tech companies that ring the toxic San Francisco bay in the Silicon Valley Toxic Coalition’s backyard, only Apple showed up repeatedly in their list of attack PR stunts throughout the year,” Eran reports.

Full article with much, much more here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “LinuxGuy and Mac Prodigal Son” for the heads up.]

Related articles:
Greenpeace ‘Guide to Greener Electronics’ report called ‘misleading and incompetent’ – September 02, 2006
Greenpeace criticizes Apple over toxic waste – August 29, 2006

88 Comments

  1. Nothing is more disturbing than extremists that undermine their own cause. I guess they are so emotionally attached to their agenda that logic just goes out the window. Like anti-abortionists that kill doctors that perform abortions, these “environmentalists” are lost in their own world view that allows them to live a double standard.

  2. As an environmentalist, it sickens me to hear that organizations might be hijacking the cause for financial gain. It dilutes the real message: that we need companies such as Apple to be as environmentally sound as possible. I am glad that Apple has adopted a recycling program, and I’m glad that they don’t offer CRTs any longer, but I’m sure they can still do better. Trouble is, if a legit environmental group comes along and points out genuine flaws with Apple’s practices, they’re going to get shouted down as money hungry bastards rather than real stewards of the earth.

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