Mac OS X Leopard developer features leaked

“Apple Computer’s recently previewed Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard has made quite a stir, not because of what was shown at the World Wide Developer Conference but of what was excluded from show, cited ‘Top Secret.’ However, the build released to attendees at the conference includes a huge number of ground-breaking changes to the underlying technology in Mac OS X and the APIs exposed to developers,’ AeroXperience (AeroXP), a Windows Vista Developers Community, reports.

AeroXP has received information detailing several of the API improvements to Leopard, including:

• Leopard will feature resolution-independent user interface and there are several functions to get the current scaling factor and apply it to pixel measurements. It is a good idea to use vector controls and buttons (PDF will work fine) or to have multiple sized resources, similar to Mac OS X icon design, so you can scale to the nearest size for the required resolution.

• Carbon, the set of APIs built upon Classic MacOS and used by most 3rd party high-profile Mac OS X applications, now allows Cocoa views to be embedded into the application. This could provide applications like Photoshop and Microsoft Office access to advanced functions previously only available to Cocoa applications.

• Time Machine has an API that allows developers to exclude unimportant files from a backup set which improves backup performance and reduces space needed for a backup.

• Core Image has been upgraded to allow access to RAW images directly

• Leopard also gives developers access to a “Latent Semantic Mapping” framework, which is the basis for spam protection in Mail. It allows you to analyze text and train the engine to restrict items with specific content(like spam e-mail for example).

• Quicktime 7.1 is included, and the underlying QTKit framework is greatly improved. There is improved correction for nonsquare pixels, use of the clean aperture which is the “user-displayable region of video that does not contain transition artifacts caused by the encoding process”, support for aperture mode dimensions, improved pitch and rate control for audio and a number of developer improvements, like QuickTime capture from sources like cameras and microphones, full screen recording or QuickTime stream recording. Live content from a capture can be broadcast as a stream over the network.

More here.

MacDailyNews Note: We’d treat these as unconfirmed rumors for now. Make of them what you will.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “vitaboy” for the heads up.]

Related MacDailyNews article:
Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard to feature ‘resolution independence?’ – May 21, 2006

48 Comments

  1. Macromancer,

    You’re right, I don’t want it to happen.. Why would anyone develop for OSX if Windows versions of apps would work just fine on OSX? Do you really want all your applications looking like Windows apps? I don’t…

    Besides, MS would sue the shit out of Apple if they ever tried this. Apple would essentially be using Microsoft’s technology (the Windows API) and eliminating the need for Microsofts flagship product. Can you even comprehend the legal ramifications of this? Well, let me spell it out for you. This would go down as the largest unfair business practice lawsuit in history, years in courts… etc. etc.. And trust me, ultimately, MS would win.

    Besides, Phillip Schiller clearly said “Absolutly not, dual-boot is our solution.”

    So yeah, keep dreaming… It will never happen.

  2. Apple’s strategy seems to be to drive OS X technologies so far ahead of the competition, that Mac OS X will become the platform of choice for developers, for consumers, and even for enterprise users.

    Apple making moves with open sourcing the Calendar server is just the first step in displacing the whole Outlook/Exchange beast that literally keeps companies suckling on Microsoft’s teat. The Linux community has failed spectacularly with trying to produce an alternative to Outlook/Exchange, but it looks like Apple is now making serious movements in that direction.

  3. Apple’s strategy seems to be to drive OS X technologies so far ahead of the competition, that Mac OS X will become the platform of choice for developers, for consumers, and even for enterprise users.

    Apple making moves with open sourcing the Calendar server is just the first step in displacing the whole Outlook/Exchange beast that literally keeps companies suckling on Microsoft’s teat. The Linux community has failed spectacularly with trying to produce an alternative to Outlook/Exchange, but it looks like Apple is now making serious movements in that direction.

    —————–

    Exactly, Apple is making it irresistable for developers not to develop for OSX. This whole Windows apps without Windows nonsense would do the exact opposite. I do not even worry, because as I said, legally it can not happen. I just wish people on these boards would think logically and realize this.

    Apple wants developers to develop OSX apps, not Windows apps.

  4. “A new Calendar Store framework allows developers access to calendar, event and task information from iCal to use in their applications or to add new events or tasks.”

    How cool would it be to select and right-click some text in a document, email, or on a web page that includes date and/or place info and add it to iCal as a task or To-Do?

  5. “Exactly, Apple is making it irresistable for developers not to develop for OSX.”

    On that note, I think it also explains Apple’s thinking behind the current ad campaign. The “I’m a Mac” and “I’m a PC” is intended to be antagonistic. Why? Because it gets Apple talked about. Try explaining the wonders of Spotlight to the average user – I suspect that eyes will glaze over more often than not, even if said person will find Spotlight useful once they learn how to use it.

    The ad campaign is designed to be antagonistic to a degree because it gets everyone talking about Apple and the Mac. Mostly, it seems to get Windows fanboys all huffing, puffing and in a red-faced tizzy, but ever seen a cat play with a mouse before a kill?

    Ever seen a champion boxer make seemingly ineffectual jabs here and there, occasionally allowing his opponent to land harmless body blows? What happens? The opponent begins to lose his cool and as he gets more desperate and enraged, begins to make mistakes, until finally, WHAM! one well-placed knockout punch ends the fight.

    Seems like to me that Apple is setting up Leopard to be that knockout punch. Time will tell, of course, but the next few months should be very interesting.

  6. i keep reading that OSX won’t get a lot of traction in ‘business’ because they don’t ‘support’ ‘business’ very well. I don’t know what that means. Networking? Reading files off a server? Sharing well with others? Whatever those things are, i’d like Apple to give more reasons for big companies to buy Mac.

  7. “I keep reading that OSX won’t get a lot of traction in ‘business’ because they don’t ‘support’ ‘business’ very well.”

    These comments refer to their unresponsive (and sometimes arrogant) attitude to corporate or educational customers. I know because a friend of mine runs IT for a school here in Philadelphia. He hates dealing with Apple because of this and is switching everything over to PC’s (unfortunately). He’s a reverse switcher.

  8. There is improved correction for nonsquare pixels

    That’s interesting.

    Last time I saw non-square pixels were the rectangular ones on the Apple IIGS twenty years go.

    Apparently they’re present on other platforms?

    Makes it kind of a pain to rotate images… ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

  9. The only thing Mac OS X doesn’t support for large businesses is ActiveX controls. My floundering mega-corp is chok-full of Windows-embedded network apps. They could easily be rewritten to support Macs.

    Aside from that, I dn’t think there’s a limitation beyond education.

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