Analyst: With Boot Camp, Apple has removed another barrier to switching

Writing about Apple’s Boot Camp which allows Intel-based Macs to dual boot Windows XP, Joe Wilcox writes for Microsoft Monitor, “The obvious benefactor would be MacBook Pro, which could appeal to people interested in the sleek laptop but needing to run Windows. For example, JupiterResearh surveys show pretty good uptake of Mac OS X on the desktop, mainly as a Unix replacement, by large businesses. Those same businesses, many of which already have rights to Windows licenses through their enterprise agreements, could install Windows XP on Intel-based Macs. For that exec long lusting for an Apple laptop, Windows XP could make the difference.”

“Similarly, there are some people that might want or need both Mac OS X and Windows. My daughter is an example. She uses Mac OS X for making movies and working with other digital content, but her favorite games all require Windows. Rather than work on two computers, she could dual-boot to Windows. The point: Apple has removed another barrier to switching,’ Wilcox writes. “Colleague Michael Gartenberg calls Boot Camp, a ‘nice tactical move by Apple that will make their platofrms and systems much more attractive.’ I totally agree… Apple should give the person(s) writing its Web copy a raise. It’s as much marketing as instructional. The Boot Camp instructions tout the software while jabbing at Microsoft. Under subhead Word to the Wise: ‘Windows running on a Mac is like Windows running on a PC. That means it’ll be subject to the same attacks that plague the Windows world. So be sure to keep it updated with the latest Microsoft Windows security fixes.’ While good advice, the wording is a knock [against Microsoft]. Another, about Extensible Firmware Interface vs. BIOS: ‘Macs use an ultra-modern industry standard technology called EFI to handle booting. Sadly, Windows XP, and even the upcoming Vista, are stuck in the 1980s with old-fashioned BIOS. But with Boot Camp, the Mac can operate smoothly in both centuries.’ Sure, the jabbing is like a little, yappy dog barking at a big dog, considering Microsoft’s dominance on the desktop compared to Apple. But this little dog has got some teeth, too.”

Full article here.

Advertisements:
Apple’s brand new iPod Hi-Fi speaker system. Home stereo. Reinvented. Available now for $349 with free shipping.
Apple’s new Mac mini. Intel Core, up to 4 times faster. Starting at just $599. Free shipping.
MacBook Pro. The first Mac notebook built upon Intel Core Duo with iLife ’06, Front Row and built-in iSight. Starting at $1999. Free shipping.
iMac. Twice as amazing — Intel Core Duo, iLife ’06, Front Row media experience, Apple Remote, built-in iSight. Starting at $1299. Free shipping.
iPod Radio Remote. Listen to FM radio on your iPod and control everything with a convenient wired remote. Just $49.
iPod. 15,000 songs. 25,000 photos. 150 hours of video. The new iPod. 30GB and 60GB models start at just $299. Free shipping.
Connect iPod to your television set with the iPod AV Cable. Just $19.

Related articles:
PC Mag wag: Is Boot Camp the end of Apple? – April 05, 2006
Macs that run Windows: The New Trojan Wars – April 05, 2006
Boot Camp: Apple’s Trojan horse into the enterprise market? – April 05, 2006
How to run Microsoft Windows XP on an Intel-based Macintosh with Boot Camp – April 05, 2006
Apple’s ‘Boot Camp’ a watershed, could dramatically expand Mac market share – April 05, 2006
Apple’s ‘Boot Camp’ is bad news for Windows-only PC box assemblers – April 05, 2006
Dude, you got a Dell? What are you, stupid? Only Apple Macs run both Mac OS X and Windows! – April 05, 2006
Reuters: Apple’s new ‘Boot Camp’ could draw millions of new Mac buyers – April 05, 2006
Apple shares surge over 6-percent in early trading on ‘Boot Camp’ news – April 05, 2006
Apple introduces Boot Camp: public beta software enables Intel-based Macs to run Windows XP – April 05, 2006

26 Comments

  1. isn’t switching between OS’s an absolute pain in the A$$ right now??

    if i remember correctly what i read, one needs to REBOOT to use the other??? that true??

    Aren’t they talking about running each OS on their own processor??

  2. Jabbing? At Microsoft? Why, who among us would ever jab their enemy when he’s down?

    “Mercy is the mark of a great man.”

    [jabs sword into side]

    “Guess I’m just a good man.”

    [jabs sword again]

    “Well, I’m alright.”

  3. Ummm, PJ, assuming you aren’t just disinguously trolling here, where have you been for the last 24 hours? The entire front page of MDN, like, is nothing but links about dual-BOOTING Windows XP on the Mac.

    Just like, you know, asking.

  4. As I have been stating all along, the Intel switch is about getting people to switch, not to punish IBM as many armchair experts have claimed. The biggest objection people have to switching is having to replace their existing software library at time of purchasing a Mac, or that they have a single application that may be unavailable for the Mac or proprietary to the business they work for.

    Allowing XP to run on Macs isn’t caving in to MS like a lot of PC apologists would like to think it is. It’s about overcoming objections to switching. Apple transitioned people successfully once when they allowed OS9 users to slowly phase out their older software, by using Classic. This is the same strategy and it’s brilliant.

  5. What the hell is the point of ‘switching’ if you’re just going to use Windows. The whole point of switching is that you’re ‘switching’ to a superior OS!

    Man, I hope this is the right move for Apple.

  6. As has been observed on several threads, an important element of the Boot Camp capability will be to help those people who are stuck with one piece of crucial legacy Windows-only software they can’t work without. A frequently cited example is AutoCad, but another one which I use in my work (and would love to play with at home because it’s just so cool) is AGI’s Satellite Toolkit (STK). I work with space software development, and STK is an important visualization and analysis tool. In its earlier life it was developed under UNIX but after version 4 it migrated to Windows-only.

    Well, I just sent AGI an email mentioning Boot Camp and saying that I’d be happy to serve as a tester of STK running on a Windows-booted Mac for them. I’d even do it gratis, assuming they’d send me a license for their 3-d Advanced Visualization Option graphics package, of course… ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />

  7. I’ve stated here on other news items about Boot Camp that I think the euphoria is totally overboard, and that at the end of the day things will settle down with, at best, only a slightly higher percentage penetration for X vs. Doze.

    But I can certainly agree with the tone and point of view of this article. I do feel it will make a differance to alot of people that OS X has this new capability. It’s a matter of degree, though.

    There will be switchers that will be convinced by this. But there is no way that this is going to dethrone Dull or MS from being the top box/OS sellers, repectively. This is absolutely a non-item to the vast majority of computer buyers. Just today a co-worker asked me about laptops for her grand son. I asked what sort of computer he was interested in. She said Dull, needed Word/PP, etc..

    That’s the real world, not the predictions that 10.5 will cause OS X market share so high that MS and Dull go out of business. A year from now I will propose a toast to anyone who proves me wrong.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.