Thurrott: Apple iPod nano is almost perfect

Recently, Apple announced “its unbelievable iPod nano device, which replaces the iPod mini. And although this might not seem possible, Apple’s control of the digital music market is now even more secure than before. And there’s nothing—absolutely nothing—that Microsoft can do about it. The iPod nano, dare I say it, is almost perfect,” Paul Thurrott writes for Connected Home.

Thurrott writes, “The first thing that strikes you about the iPod nano—and you really need to see it in person to appreciate this—is how small it is. It’s barely wider, and actually quite a bit thinner, than the iPod shuffle, but it features a gorgeous full-color screen and a standard iPod scroll wheel. It fits in the palm of your hand like a tiny, beautiful jewel, and it gathers stares and comments from onlookers like no other digital device.

“Both [the 2GB and the 4GB iPod nano] devices feature the wonderfully simple color menu system that the high-end iPod uses. However, the iPod nano also includes some extras you won’t find anywhere else, including a multiple-time-zone clock, a stopwatch (perfect for you music-loving athletes), and a few new games. Apple has also added the ability to synchronize Microsoft Outlook contacts and calendars, making the iPod nano a handy PIM replacement, as well,” Thurrott writes. “Battery life is exceptional… Sound quality is superb, thanks to enhanced audio circuitry that first debuted in the iPod shuffle.”

“As I said, the iPod nano is almost perfect. Apple cheaps out by not including a carrying case or lanyard for the device; either would prevent you from simply tossing the device in your pocket and subjecting it to abuse from coins, keys, or other paraphernalia. My test unit is already scuffed up pretty severely, despite my attempts to baby it. And I’ve got real concerns that the skinny iPod nano could be easily killed by inadvertently sitting on it. The device is that thin,” Thurrott writes. “These are all quibbles, of course. The iPod nano is that rarest of tech devices: Immensely useful, beautiful, and desirable—all at the same time. We’re getting to the point at which most new iPod purchases are probably coming from repeat customers. So, whether you already have an iPod or not, the iPod nano is a great device to consider. It just doesn’t get any better than this.”

Full article here.

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Ars Technica drove a car over an iPod nano (twice) and it kept working, so concerns about iPod nano “being easily killed by inadvertently sitting on it” would seem to be unfounded. In fact, as Ars reported, “Our first test consisted of placing the iPod nano on a solid wood chair and sitting on it, as people are prone to do from time to time. As you can guess, this ‘test’ yielded basically zero damage results—so little, in fact, that we didn’t even take pictures.”

Related article:
CNET iPod nano review: ‘Sets new standards, stretches boundaries of tech, Apple’s done it again’ – September 16, 2005
The New York Times’ Pogue states iPod’s Law: the impossible is possible – September 14, 2005
Associated Press praises Apple iPod nano, takes swipe at Microsoft WMA-based also-ran music services – September 14, 2005
Apple’s music competition having tough time and the iPod nano won’t help them – September 14, 2005
One of big stars at Microsoft’s PDC show: Apple’s iPod nano; Microsoft reps ‘in awe’ – September 14, 2005
Piper Jaffray: Apple seeing high demand for iPod nano – September 14, 2005
Australian IT: Apple iPod nano ‘a little bar of techno-joy’ – September 14, 2005
Apple iPod nano takes a beating and keeps on beating – September 12, 2005
Apple’s iPod nano: The ‘thin lady’ sings unwelcome iTune to competitors – September 09, 2005
Hands on with Apple iPod nano – September 09, 2005
Mossberg: Apple iPod nano ‘beautiful, incredibly thin, and exceeds Apple’s performance specs’ – September 08, 2005
Apple’s iPod nano will make competitors whimper, Motorola’s ROKR inexplicably bland – September 07, 2005
Tech pundit Enderle: ‘iPod Nano is a hit,’ Motorola ROKR ‘simply doesn’t have enough Apple in it’ – September 07, 2005
Jupiter analyst Gartenberg: ‘the market is going to go for Apple iPod nano in a big way’ – September 07, 2005
Analyst: iPod nano ‘could be Apple’s next home run’ – September 07, 2005
Video of Steve Jobs introducing iPod nano, ROKR iTunes phone now available online – September 07, 2005
Apple’s Steve Jobs predicts ultra-thin iPod nano ‘will become the highest volume iPod in the world’ – September 07, 2005
Apple’s iPod nano will make competitors whimper, Motorola’s ROKR inexplicably bland – September 07, 2005
Apple introduces iPod nano – September 07, 2005

37 Comments

  1. Ever since Steve returned I’ve noticed a great shift of perception… Most products introduced seem not to be fully appreciated until you see them yourselves. GarageBand, iMac’s, iPods even OS X.

    While Apple ain’t perfect, they’ve really got it (mostly) together compared to others in the industry. Yeah, they make mistakes and some not-so-perfect products, but hey, they’re better than anything else out there (end to end).

    IMHO Jb

  2. Works with Outlook? Not so fast Uncle Pauly! I got one for my wife not just for the music but for the Outlook synching features – which does not currently work! Calendar works but if it tries to sync the Contacts, I get a big fat -50 error. iTunes 5.0.1 didn’t fix it either. Still waiting for a response from Cupertino.

    Almost perfect? Almost…

  3. Driving a car over the nano may not produce the same stress as sitting on it. The car’s tire will displace the weight evenly over the entire device, whereas sitting on it may project a lot of force on a much smaller area (like bending if it was in your front jeans pocket).

  4. << Driving a car over the nano may not produce the same stress as sitting on it. The car’s tire will displace the weight evenly over the entire device, whereas sitting on it may project a lot of force on a much smaller area (like bending if it was in your front jeans pocket). >>

    How many people do you know that sit on a hard unbending surface? My experience is that most people sit on something that is at minimum cushioned. That cushioning will absorb a great deal of the stress necessary to damage a nano.

    But then again, how many people are going to put the nano in their back pocket? This is a non-issue.

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