Dension announces ice>Link v1.1 for iPod: iPod vehicle interconnection

Dension has announced ice>Link v1.1 which the manufacturer says is the ultimate solution in high quality iPod vehicle interconnection. ice>Link takes the place of your external CD Changer and it operates like one. iPod starts when CD changer is�selected on a supported factory or aftermarket radio, and paused when other source is selected. Track control from radio and steering wheel controls are provided.

ICE>Link v1.1 allows cross platform compatibility and effortless migration from classic to 3G or mini iPods without having to replace the entire ICE>Link unit. Even better, you can use all generations by simply using the appropriate connectors.��

Dension lists the following supported vehicles:

AUDI
BMW / Mini
Chrysler cars
Ford cars
GM cars
Honda / Accura
Jaguar
Landrover
Lexus
Mazda
Mercedes
Nissan / Infiniti
Porsche
Saab
Scion
Subaru
Toyota
Volkswagen
Volvo

Dension lists the following supported aftermarket makes:

Pioneer
Panasonic
Sony
Kenwood
Blaupunkt
Alpine M-Bus compatible (not AI net!)
Grundig

ICELink v1.1 for iPod now features interchangeable connection options to support all current iPod models – classic, 4G, 3G and mini.

More info here.

MacDailyNews Take: We still want head units that accept iPods like they would an 8-Track tape: stick in the iPod, dock-connector first, and it can be controlled from the head unit and/or the steering wheel while simultaneously charging the iPod’s battery. What’s taking so long?!

Related MacDailyNews article:
Apple request: we need the Apple ‘iBox’ and ‘iPodCar’ products now – August 07, 2003

25 Comments

  1. This is old news. I’ve had an ICELink v.1.1 in my car for about a month now and was “jonesing” for it long before that…roughly a year and a half.

    When are they going to add pause & random-play control from the head unit and song information display on the head unit? Other than those missing features, I love the product.

  2. Only SOME of the cars listed as supported are really supported. For example, my 2002 Honda S2000 is not supported while later S2000’s are. And Civics are not supported at all.

    Check the iceLink list more carefully before getting excited. They seem to have done a good job of preventing users being able to purchase online if users don’t have the correct model or year.

  3. Or worse yet, accidentally forgetting it was there and having it stolen (and then have to pay for the broken window)… but that could happen with the other adapters, now, too… except those that can be hidden away in a locked glovebox or trunk.

  4. I doubt that’s ever going to happen. It’s much easier and safer for audio manufacturers to just change a cable/connector than a whole head unit.

    Why would anyone want to buy a new car stereo everytime you buy a new iPod with a changed Apple Connector???

    Apple has a history of changing connectors. They did it with the iPod already between the second and third generations. We’re on the 4th, so if history repeats itself, we may get a new connector on the 5th.

    Other examples: FireWire 400 versus 800 (really stupid – we don’t need FireWire to become another SCSI – even Intel got it right with USB 2, or maybe they just thought ahead with USB 1.1).

    With Video/Monitor support it was proprietary, then open (VGA). then proprietary (ADC), then open (DVI). Don’t get me started…

  5. I’m with MDN on this one. Right now I have a perfect place waiting right in my stereo: the cassette slot. It’s just about the right size and it would be so nice to just shove the iPod in there and then use the head unit controls to navigate. The unit already has a screen at least as big as the iPod’s.

    Now if I just had a couple of mill in developement money lying around and knew anything about electronics…

    And as Bob C said: despite the fanfare, the ice-Link coverage is rather limited and very patchy. For my own vehicle, it’s only compatible with an optional 3rd-party upgrade, not with any of the OEM stereos.

  6. Actually, it will work fine in my Audi (and I, too, have been jonesing for one, though I have a hard time justifying spending $600 and losing my CD player).

    I agree with MDN, I’d love a head unit that worked that way. Better still, a stereo that “synced” with my iPod so I could plug it in and it would dowload the music from my iPod. Then I could safely put my iPod away.

  7. >MacDailyNews Take: We still want head units that accept iPods like they would an 8-Track tape: stick in the iPod, dock-connector first, and it can be controlled from the head unit and/or the steering wheel while simultaneously charging the iPod’s battery. What’s taking so long?!

    What’s taking so long? Well, it’s far from a good idea.

    The portable music industry – iPod and the like – is still very young! Putting an iPod inside a player forces a company to stand behind a proprietary piece of equipment. Even withing its own line, the iPod changes enough to warrant slight redesigns – size, dimension, weight.

    Here’s something you haven’t thought of: How much physical space will an 8-track iPod take up in the already-crowded interior of head units?

    The more realistic approach is to incorporate some sort of communication protocol between the portable player and the head unit. That way, the head unit can support protocols rather than having to commit to a single product, a single company, and a small amount of sales.

    Buy a head unit just to support an iPod?!

    MDN, you bend over too far for Apple! I hope it pays well.

    ——

    Work on supporting a communications protocol, transmitted via WiFi/Bluetooth. C’mon folks, free your minds! Think!

  8. >MacDailyNews Take: We still want head units that accept iPods like they would an 8-Track tape: stick in the iPod, dock-connector first, and it can be controlled from the head unit and/or the steering wheel while simultaneously charging the iPod’s battery. What’s taking so long?!

    What’s taking so long? Well, it’s far from a good idea.

    The portable music industry – iPod and the like – is still very young! Putting an iPod inside a player forces a company to stand behind a proprietary piece of equipment. Even withing its own line, the iPod changes enough to warrant slight redesigns – size, dimension, weight.

    Here’s something you haven’t thought of: How much physical space will an 8-track iPod take up in the already-crowded interior of head units?

    The more realistic approach is to incorporate some sort of communication protocol between the portable player and the head unit. That way, the head unit can support protocols rather than having to commit to a single product, a single company, and a small amount of sales.

    Buy a head unit just to support an iPod?!

    MDN, you bend over too far for Apple! I hope it pays well.

    ——

    Work on supporting a communications protocol, transmitted via WiFi/Bluetooth. C’mon folks, free your minds! Think!

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