Apple, Microsoft hit with patent lawsuits

“BTG claims in a lawsuit against Microsoft and Apple that Web-enabled software update technologies used by both infringe on the patent awarded to Teleshuttle Technologies. BTG, a company that licenses and manages intellectual property, has exclusive worldwide licensing rights to the patent,” Susan Kuchinskas reports for InternetNews.

“The suit was filed in Federal Court in the Northern District of California following BTG’s unsuccessful attempts to get the Redmond, Wash.-based software vendor and the Santa Clara, Calif.-based software, hardware and peripherals supplier to license the technology on ‘commercially reasonable terms,'” Kuchinskas reports.

Full article here.

22 Comments

  1. This is an absolute complete joke! There are some real leeches out there…, they don’t innovate, they think up an idea, patent it, and then wait for someone else to implement the technology and then sue for commercial licensing fees. The US patent system is in a mess to allow this.

  2. Switcher:

    Good point. Patent protection should exist for products not ideas. It seem patently obvious (sorry) that if one cannot bring a good idea to market one should not be able to benefit from the idea.

  3. Moreover, OS X was using Software Update (and I think WinXP was using Windows Update) before 2003. Why was the patent issued to this guy at all? I’ll have to ask my law school friends who know patent law, but this seems to me to be a one-in-a-million shot, hoping for a windfall from a quick (and relatively small) settlement.

  4. This just in…

    US Patent Office buried by bullshit.

    This patent is a totally obvious use of the internet, a server, a computer, and applescript (or any other programming method, for that matter).

  5. “Patent protection should exist for products not ideas. It seem patently obvious (sorry) that if one cannot bring a good idea to market one should not be able to benefit from the idea.”

    Are you mad? Patents exist to protect the intellectual property of inventors and discoverers, not to reward entrepreneurial ability in bringing a product to market. I know some one who invented a technology now used in every telephone, but he was certainly in no position to start a manufacturing operation. But he could, and did, sell the rights to someone who could. If you had no patent on such an invention, how long do you think it would take for some fat cat corporation to steal your idea, make our like a bandit, and leave you softly whining in a corner?

    I do not write this as a defense of BTG, just a defense of the value of patents for inventions.

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