IBM reaches POWERful milestone; next-gen POWER5-based Servers up and running

IBM today announced that the first servers based on its next generation POWER5 microprocessors are up and running in IBM’s Poughkeepsie labs. Initial internal performance tests indicate that POWER5 based eServer systems are expected to offer four times the system performance over the first POWER4 based servers. Apple’s new Power Mac G5 PowerPC 970 CPU is based upon IBM’s POWER4 microprocessor.

POWER5 based eServer systems are expected to start shipping to customers next year in IBM eServer pSeries and iSeries systems as well as IBM TotalStorage(TM) Enterprise Storage Server.

“This is a significant milestone for IBM and our customers,” said Adalio Sanchez, general manager, IBM eServer pSeries in the press release. “Since its inception IBM has delivered the POWER technology roadmap with substantial performance improvement from one generation to the next. IBM is committed to winning by consistently delivering customers the best performing technology at the lowest possible cost.”

POWER5 based eServer pSeries systems will be available with AIX – the industry’s fastest growing UNIX operating system (based on year-to year IDC Q1 03 UNIX server tracking data) – or Linux, offering customers the widest possible choice for proven application support.

IBM previously announced that the Department of Energy will use over 12,000 POWER5 microprocessors to power ASCI Purple, the world’s first supercomputer that will be capable of up to 100 teraflops of processing power, which will be more than twice as fast as the most powerful computer in existence today.

IBM’s POWER family of microprocessors is among the most widely used in the industry and can be found in Nintendo game consoles, Apple computers and some of the world’s most powerful supercomputers and storage systems.

17 Comments

  1. 12,000 processers in one machine.
    Wonder how many fans that needs ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”smile” style=”border:0;” />
    Hmm wonder if that will be faster than dual prescott machines. Probably not if you ask a wintel head

  2. “IBM previously announced that the Department of Energy will use over 12,000 POWER5 microprocessors to power ASCI Purple, the world’s first supercomputer that will be capable of up to 100 teraflops of processing power, which will be more than twice as fast as the most powerful computer in existence today.”

    I hope they don’t use Apple’s benchmarking technique to figure that out!!!

  3. I don’t know what IBM did to achieve performance four times greater. However, as with ‘hyperthreading’, improvements for server systems don’t necessarily translate to all applications. So, I wonder how these improvements might ultimately translate to a Mac.

  4. The Power4 core was the basis of the core for the PowerPC 970 (aka G5). The Power5 core is the basis of the core for the PowerPC 980. Will the 980 be labeled G6? I don’t know. I’m inclined to believe not since the 980 is expected sometime next year (too soon for another processor renaming…it’ll prolly be labeled somethingl ike G5+ or something the same way that the G4+ was used and the PPC 604e was used). Just my to cents.

  5. Don:

    Wierd; that’s *exactly* what I was thinking.

    Brother Mugga

    PS: By the way, having the same train of consciousness should *really* concern you. I’d stuff out in the buffet car and then jump off at the next stop, if I were you…

  6. Apple didn’t do the G5 benchmark nimrod. It was a 3rd
    party company that did it. Can’t stand the thought of
    your puny pentium getting royally toasted, eh? ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

    Mac Maven

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