Steve Jobs was born on February 24, 1955. Today would have been his 63rd birthday, had the co-founder of Apple Inc. had not succumbed to complications from pancreatic cancer on October 5, 2011.

That day, the world lost a visionary genius, a brilliant showman, a focused perfectionist, and a charismatic disruptor.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life.

Almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important.

Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet, death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it, and that is how it should be, because death is very likely the single best invention of life. It’s life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. — Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs on his 1966 BMW R60/2 motorcycle, 1981 (Photo by Charles O’Rear, National Geographic Image Collection, Washington, D.C.)

Steve Jobs on his 1966 BMW R60/2 motorcycle, 1981 (Photo by Charles O’Rear, National Geographic Image Collection, Washington, D.C.)

 

MacDailyNews Take: We miss you, Steve! Gone far too soon.

On the day, and for many days after, of Steve’s death, those who know us consoled us on his passing as if a close family member of ours had died. Was our love for Steve really that obvious?! The depth of those condolences offered to us as Steve passed will always stick with us.

We don’t get a chance to do that many things, and every one should be really excellent. Because this is our life. Life is brief, and then you die, you know? And we’ve all chosen to do this with our lives. So it better be damn good. It better be worth it. – Steve Jobs