“In the summer of 2017, I wanted to know what it would be like to use an iPad Pro as my main computer,” Jannis Hermanns blogs eponymously. “I found out that it can actually work, thanks to an iOS app called Blink, an SSH replacement called Mosh, iOS 11 and running stuff on a server.”

“I pretty much spend most of my programming time in the terminal. I use zsh as a shell (although I’ve been interested in elvish lately), tmux for window management and neovim as an editor,” Hermanns writes. “I program mostly in ruby, go and node and run everything using Docker.”

“Apart from that, I use Inbox and Slack for communication, a web browser for my googling, dash to look up documentation, 1Password to manage my passwords and Alfred to be fast at all of that,” Hermanns writes. “In conclusion, I guess you can say that my workflow is suited perfectly for this experiment. I’d be out of luck if I relied on a visual IDE or proprietary software as is the case when you’re, say, an iOS developer.”

iPad Pro, in 10.5-inch and 12.9-inch models, introduces the world’s most advanced display and breakthrough performance

iPad Pro, in 10.5-inch and 12.9-inch models, introduces the world’s most advanced display and breakthrough performance

 
Hermanns writes. “The iPad Pro with Apple’s Smart Keyboard in conjunction with a server running ZSH, tmux and neovim makes a fantastic portable development machine that leaves very little to wish for.”

Tons more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Very cool and even more proof that, yes, Apple’s iPad is very much a “real computer.”