“Just this week, The Wall Street Journal reported on the high-volume business Apple is doing with Samsung, a key supplier of components for various products including the new flagship iPhone, the iPhone X, on which Samsung will reportedly make $110 per unit,” Florian Mueller writes for FOSS Patents. “But as device makers, the two remain fierce competitors–and adversaries in court.”

“A few months after the Supreme Court of the United States requested the Trump Administration’s perspective on Samsung’s most recent petition for writ of certiorari, the Solicitor General of the United States, Noel Francisco, has expressed the views of the U.S. federal government,” Mueller writes.

Apple CEO Tim Cook and U.S. President Donald Trump at tech summit in June 2017

Apple CEO Tim Cook and U.S. President Donald Trump at tech summit in June 2017

“The short version is this: the DoJ tells the Supreme Court to deny all three parts of Samsung’s petition, but it’s not a ringing endorsement of the Federal Circuit’s controversial en banc decision. Not at all. It’s completely based on procedural and standard-of-review considerations.”

Mueller writes, “It’s too early to have statistics on how the Supreme Court views Solicitor General Francisco’s recommendations. But it’s not like it’s over for Samsung. It’s a setback for them and, conversely, a significant intermediate victory for Apple, but the Supreme Court can still decide either way.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Thanks mostly to the glacial pace of legal proceedings, justice will never be fully served in these cases of obvious theft, patent infringement, and trade dress infringement.

The main reason why Samsung and the rest of the thieves are able to sell phones and tablets at all was because they made and continue to make fake iPhones and fake iPads designed to fool the ignorati in much the same way that Microsoft et al. profited wildly from upside-down and backwards fake Macs at the end of the 20th century. Google, Samsung, HTC, Xiaomi, et al. are the Microsofts, HPs, Dells, and eMachines of the new century.

If it’s not an iPhone, it’s not an iPhone.

Apple’s products came first, then Samsung’s:

Samsung Galaxy and Galaxy Tab Trade Dress Infringement

Here’s what Google’s Android looked like before and after Apple’s iPhone:

Google Android before and after Apple iPhone

And, here’s what cellphones looked like before and after Apple’s iPhone:

cellphones before and after Apple iPhone

People who buy Android phones and tablets reward thieves.