“Tech behemoths including Apple and Google and leading cryptologists are urging President Obama to reject any government proposal that alters the security of smartphones and other communications devices so that law enforcement can view decrypted data,” Ellen Nakashima reports for The Washington Post. “In a letter to be sent Tuesday and obtained by The Washington Post, a coalition of tech firms, security experts and others appeal to the White House to protect privacy rights as it considers how to address law enforcement’s need to access data that is increasingly encrypted. ‘Strong encryption is the cornerstone of the modern information economy’s security,’ said the letter, signed by more than 140 tech companies, prominent technologists and civil society groups.”

“FBI and Justice Department officials say they support the use of encryption but want a way for officials to get the lawful access they need,” Nakashima reports. “Many technologists say there is no way to do so without building a separate key to unlock the data — often called a ‘backdoor,’ which they say amounts to a vulnerability that can be exploited by hackers and foreign governments.”

“The letter is signed by three of the five members of a presidential review group appointed by Obama in 2013 to assess technology policies in the wake of leaks by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden. The signatories urge Obama to follow the group’s unanimous recommendation that the government should ‘fully support and not undermine efforts to create encryption standards’ and not ‘in any way subvert, undermine, weaken or make vulnerable’ commercial software,” Nakashima reports. “Richard A. Clarke, former cyber­security adviser to President George W. Bush and one of three review group members to sign the letter, noted that a similar effort by the government in the 1990s to require phone companies to build a backdoor for encrypted voice calls was rebuffed. ‘If they couldn’t pull it off at the end of the Cold War, they sure as hell aren’t going to pull it off now,’ he said.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Adhere to the U.S. Constitution.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.United States Constitution, Amendment IV

Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. – Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it was once like in the United States where men were free. – Ronald Reagan, March 30, 1961

Visit the Apple-backed reformgovernmentsurveillance.com today.

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