T-Mobile: Hackers stole personal data of more than 2 million customers

T-Mobile has posted the following message to customers, verbatim:

Out of an abundance of caution, we wanted to let you know about an incident that we recently handled that may have impacted some of your personal information.

On August 20, our cyber-security team discovered and shut down an unauthorized access to certain information, including yours, and we promptly reported it to authorities. None of your financial data (including credit card information) or social security numbers were involved, and no passwords were compromised. However, you should know that some of your personal information may have been exposed, which may have included one or more of the following: name, billing zip code, phone number, email address, account number and account type (prepaid or postpaid).

If you have questions about this incident or your account, please contact Customer Care at your convenience. If you are a T-Mobile customer, you can dial 611, use two-way messaging on MyT-Mobile.com, the T-Mobile App, or iMessage through Apple Business Chat. You can also request a call back or schedule a time for your Team of Experts to call you through both the T-Mobile App and MyT-Mobile.com. If you are a T-Mobile For Business or Metro PCS customer, just dial 611 from your mobile phone.

We take the security of your information very seriously and have a number of safeguards in place to protect your personal information from unauthorized access. We truly regret that this incident occurred and are so sorry for any inconvenience this has caused you.

More info here.

MacDailyNews Note: T-NMobile also notes: All affected customers have been, or shortly will be, notified. If you don’t receive a notification than that means your account was not among those impacted by this incident.

6 Comments

  1. After yet another major security breach, all of my personal information is spread across the internet. Once it gets out it is copied and sold and recopied and combined with other databases – you can never rope it back in.

    This is effectively another example of grand theft, but there will be no punishment and no restitution. I am just supposed to shrug and thank T-Mobile for “tak[ing[ the security of [my] information very seriously and hav[ing] a number of safeguards in place to protect your personal information from unauthorized access.” I am also supposed to be grateful that they “…truly regret that this incident occurred and are so sorry for any inconvenience this has caused [me].”

    Thanks…for nothing. Actually, for less than nothing.

  2. I’ll add T-Mobile to the list of companies I have done business with that have allowed the bad guys to get my private information. If the list gets any longer, I will have to resort to font size 10 on Word to fit it onto one page.

  3. I got a notification from T-mobile today. The last time T-mobile let my data get stolen via Experian (October 2015), they had to sign me up for a free year of credit monitoring….with the company that let it happen in the first place. 15 million rather than 2 million. So gee, I guess they are improving.

    That sound you hear is my eyes rolling.

  4. “We take the security of your information merely very seriously, not totally seriously, and have a number, but not all, safeguards in place to protect some of your personal information from unauthorized access. So, as you can see, we are no longer the sole authority over your personal data. We truly, but not completely, regret that this gross breach of security occurred – we use the passive voice to avoid emphasizing that we, T-Mobile made the boo boo – and are only so sorry but not completely.”

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